Empowerment and self-management

English

The history of diabetes nutrition therapy: from starvation to evidence-based recommendations

“For forty-eight hours after admission to the hospital the patient is kept on an ordinary diet, to determine the severity of his diabetes. Then he is starved, and no food allowed save whiskey and black coffee. The whiskey is given in the coffee: 1 ounce of whiskey every two hours, from 7am until 7pm. The whiskey is not an essential part of treatment; it merely furnishes a few calories and keeps the patient more comfortable while he is being starved.” Starvation (Allen) Treatment of Diabetes (1915).

Meal-time blood sugar control in pregnancy

We have known for more than half a century that good control of blood sugar (glucose) is important for the normal development of the unborn baby throughout pregnancy. During those years there has been much progress in advising

Home blood glucose monitoring: a useful self-management tool

There is no doubt that the introduction of home blood glucose monitoring has helped to revolutionize diabetes management and reduce the amount of time people with diabetes need to spend in hospital to stabilize their condition. However, this has given rise to a series of compliance and management issues for the person with diabetes and the health professional who provides their care. Jan Alford reports.

Keeping people at the centre of care: a challenge to health professionals?

The establishment of a practice which puts the person at the centre of care will require a change in the attitudes and beliefs of health professionals, and people with diabetes. A service which places the person with diabetes at the centre of care will undoubtedly demand the adoption of this philosophy by the organizations responsible for the delivery of diabetes care, as well as those networks serving the

Empowering children with diabetes and their parents

When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, the news usually comes as a shock to all family members. This often provokes a crisis which is associated with grief and sadness; a complex scenario emerges. Children with diabetes and their parents often feel overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge required to effectively manage the condition. Parents and children experience feelings of guilt. Parents sometimes feel they may have been able to prevent their child's diabetes; children may blame themselves for an illness, and perceive the condition and its treatment as a form of punishment.

Understanding the psychological barriers to effective diabetes therapy

In order to minimize the risk of diabetes complications, effective therapy for people with Type 2 diabetes involves lifestyle changes and poly-pharmacy targeting levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat. However, the strict targets set in recent guidelines are seldom achieved by the majority of people with diabetes. Barriers to effective diabetes therapy have been identified within the organization of health care and in the interaction between health-care providers and people with

Diabetes education in the spotlight

The IDF Congress has historically served as an international forum for sharing scientific advances. For the first time in Congress history, education, nutrition and the psychosocial aspects of diabetes were showcased in a specific track and addressed in a plenary lecture at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City. The inclusion of these themes served as a reassuring confirmation that the world's diabetes experts recognize the relevance of education and psychosocial aspects in improving diabetes outcomes.

"We can control the diabetes on our own"

“We can control the disease on our own” are the words of Muhammad Ali Muhammad Ishaq Mukaddam, Pakistan, an advocate of self-monitoring, who has been on haemodialysis for the last two years.

Empowerment and how it can be implemented: the role of diabetes associations

The definitions of empowerment are many but less varied. They all tend to refer to a ‘process’. In this article, Mr Bjørnar Allgot, Norway, briefly analyses the concept of empowerment and gives guidelines as to how this process can be achieved. Finally, as IDF Vice President, Mr Allgot sees the need for the International Diabetes Federation to create an effective tool for evaluating empowerment which can be used by member associations around the world.

German website: a stamp of quality

In the face of rising diabetes prevalence in Germany, empowerment of people with diabetes and access to information is especially needed for the prevention of the condition itself, as well as its complications. To this end, a cooperative effort between the National Ministry of Health, the German Diabetes Research Institute and the two national diabetes organizations, Deutsche Diabetes-Gesellschaft (DDG) and the Deutsche Diabetes Union (DDU), has created a new website offering up-to-date and quality assured information for people with diabetes and healthcare professionals alike.

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