Education

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Learning the lessons - preventing type 2 diabetes in Nepal

Diabetes has become a significant public health problem in urban Nepal. Studies carried out by the Nepal Diabetes Association in towns and cities throughout the country have revealed a diabetes prevalence of around 15% among people aged 20 years and above, and 19% among people aged 40 years and above. The Association has identified a number of key issues which continue to exacerbate this epidemic in Nepal.

Addressing inequalities in access through long-term collaboration

Diabetes is a life-long chronic condition. Herein lies one of the major challenges to addressing global inequalities in diabetes care. The costs of insulin and monitoring are often beyond the resources of people with diabetes or their country’s healthcare system. While it is easier to secure temporary price reductions or short-term financial support in the form of donations or grants than it is to find long-term ongoing support, diabetes needs in most countries are not temporary.

The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


Helping children with diabetes to succeed at school

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic conditions in school-age children. In the USA, about 154 400 young people aged 20 years or younger have diabetes – about one in very 400 to 500. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 80% of cases. In certain ethnic groups, however, the proportion of type 2 diabetes in young people is much higher. With the epidemic of overweight and obesity, healthcare professionals are finding increasing numbers of young people with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

Education and public information: preventing diabetic ketoacidosis in Italy

Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis has a 100% death rate. Indeed, ketoacidosis is a leading cause of death and disability in children with type 1 diabetes. Severe acidosis often develops during an extended period in which hyperglycaemia-related symptoms are misdiagnosed. Reducing this period may be sufficient to prevent severe acidosis in newly diagnosed children with diabetes.

Nutrition and diabetes: global challenges for children and parents

Many children around the world are starving or undernourished. In contrast, obesity and type 2 diabetes in children are major problems in many countries. These contradicting nutritional crises strongly affect the way we care for children with diabetes and their families. Recent international guidelines on the care of children with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes recognize that effective nutritional management and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle can improve diabetes outcomes.

What is so different about diabetes in children?

While both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can occur in children and adolescents, the overwhelming majority of people affected by diabetes worldwide are adults. Consequently, the specific needs of children are often overlooked. Type 1 diabetes, the most common chronic disease in children in developed countries, is growing by 5% among pre-school children and by 3% in children and adolescents each year – 70 000 new cases every year in children aged 14 years and younger worldwide.

Protecting our children worldwide: the first UN-observed World Diabetes Day

Diabetes is finally emerging from the shadows thanks largely to the recent adoption by the UN General Assembly of a landmark Resolution on diabetes. This Resolution, which recognizes the severity of diabetes and encourages Member States to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes, is closely linked to the UN Millennium Development Goals. One of the UN’s targets for 2015, Millennium Goal number 4, is to reduce child mortality worldwide.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Energy, motivation and commitment - the IDF Youth Ambassadors

In many countries, young people work effectively as advocates for a range of causes, from inner-city regeneration to anti-bullying and smoking cessation. An IDF initiative aimed to engage Youth Ambassadors in diabetes advocacy worldwide and specifically to participate at as many levels as possible in IDF’s global awareness campaign ’Unite For Diabetes’. In this article, representatives from the group describe the principles and objectives of the IDF Youth Ambassadors programme and make a call for increased involvement of young people in diabetes advocacy.

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