Education

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Reaching for dreams: enjoying sucessful diabetes management through sports

Despite the wealth of evidence to support the health benefits of physical activity in people with diabetes, many people, when diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, decide to refrain from taking part in sports, and some are even advised to do so by their healthcare provider. When Olympic volleyball player, Bas van de Goor, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his lack of diabetes knowledge led him to believe he should retire from organized sport.

Motivating, learning and socializing: summer camps for elderly people with diabetes

A conversation with a 70-year-old woman with diabetes gave an endocrinologist working in Belgrade, Serbia, an interesting idea. The patient expressed her desire to go on holiday but was clearly worried about managing her diabetes away from home – without access to familiar healthcare resources. Teodora Beljic recognized the need for some form of holiday facility for older people with diabetes, and decided to explore the feasibility of recreational and educational programmes.

Educating, supporting, understanding: a challenging role for parents of children with diabetes

Diabetes is a family affair. When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, a wide range of challenges affects parents and siblings. While the role of parents in day-to-day living with diabetes is subject to constant change according to the age of their child, it is always crucial. Families constantly experience their loved-one’s diabetes, in an emotional as well as a practical sense. Eveline van Gulik explores some of the challenges faced by parents of children with diabetes, and describes, from her own experience, the enormous impact on family life.

Delivering diabetes care to people with intellectual disability

Typically, people with learning difficulties due to intellectual disability face a variety of daily challenges, and require continual support from specialized carers. If they are affected by a chronic medical condition, such as diabetes, people with intellectual disability require coordinated support from diabetes-aware carers and informed healthcare providers.

Learning the lessons - preventing type 2 diabetes in Nepal

Diabetes has become a significant public health problem in urban Nepal. Studies carried out by the Nepal Diabetes Association in towns and cities throughout the country have revealed a diabetes prevalence of around 15% among people aged 20 years and above, and 19% among people aged 40 years and above. The Association has identified a number of key issues which continue to exacerbate this epidemic in Nepal.

Addressing inequalities in access through long-term collaboration

Diabetes is a life-long chronic condition. Herein lies one of the major challenges to addressing global inequalities in diabetes care. The costs of insulin and monitoring are often beyond the resources of people with diabetes or their country’s healthcare system. While it is easier to secure temporary price reductions or short-term financial support in the form of donations or grants than it is to find long-term ongoing support, diabetes needs in most countries are not temporary.

The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


Helping children with diabetes to succeed at school

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic conditions in school-age children. In the USA, about 154 400 young people aged 20 years or younger have diabetes – about one in very 400 to 500. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 80% of cases. In certain ethnic groups, however, the proportion of type 2 diabetes in young people is much higher. With the epidemic of overweight and obesity, healthcare professionals are finding increasing numbers of young people with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

Education and public information: preventing diabetic ketoacidosis in Italy

Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis has a 100% death rate. Indeed, ketoacidosis is a leading cause of death and disability in children with type 1 diabetes. Severe acidosis often develops during an extended period in which hyperglycaemia-related symptoms are misdiagnosed. Reducing this period may be sufficient to prevent severe acidosis in newly diagnosed children with diabetes.

Nutrition and diabetes: global challenges for children and parents

Many children around the world are starving or undernourished. In contrast, obesity and type 2 diabetes in children are major problems in many countries. These contradicting nutritional crises strongly affect the way we care for children with diabetes and their families. Recent international guidelines on the care of children with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes recognize that effective nutritional management and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle can improve diabetes outcomes.

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