Education

English

Staging an effective awareness-raising campaign with limited resources

The Philippines, with a population of 76.5 million, is considered a developing country. Health services are provided by the state through health centres, local clinics and hospitals, as well as private-sector health facilities. While WHO recommends that countries should spend at least 5% of their GNP for health, the Philippines health budget is only around 3.4% of the country’s GNP (264 million USD) – compared with the military’s budget of 566 million USD.

The IDF Education Foundation: promoting excellence in diabetes care

The IDF Education Foundation was established in 1992 during the IDF Presidency of Wendell Mayes Jr. The Foundation is a practical benevolent initiative which, since its inception, has functioned exclusively in support of people with diabetes in developing regions. These countries constitute the bulk of the IDF membership; 60% of Member Associations are in countries with an annual GDP of less than 3500 USD per capita.

Against the odds: overcoming diabetes in Patagonia

When I met Sonia Carrasco, 14 years ago, she was suffering from diabetes ketoacidosis – extremely high glucose levels, a sign of poorly controlled diabetes. Although she had been living with the condition for about 6 years, her diabetes knowledge was minimal, reflecting a general lack of health awareness. When I asked Sonia to describe her feelings the day she was given a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, 20 years before, she recalls an experience made all the more terrifying by an acute fear of the unknown. She had understood that she had leukaemia.

Waking up to diabetes in Papua New Guinea - Jacklyin's story

My daughter Jacklyin was born in January 1990, three months premature. Her early birth gave her unusual status among her family and the rest of the community in our village, Gumine – in the Province of Chimbu, in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. She would always be given our special protection and ate the best of all children in the village.

Lifestyle and nutritional management

It is often stated that dietary management is a cornerstone of diabetes care. More recently, physical activity has also been recognized as a useful fundamental intervention. When it is realized that both of these can affect a variety of the problems that bedevil people with diabetes – including excess body weight, high blood glucose levels, high blood fat levels, and high blood pressure – it is not difficult to see why these issues might be regarded as fundamental.

Patient education and psychological care

People with diabetes deliver most of their own care. This reflects the observation that diabetes and its associated features touch on most aspects of daily living, and aspects as fundamental as eating and physical activity. To deliver such care requires knowledge, but even with knowledge it may not be easy to adjust to optimal self-care. This makes patient education a complex therapeutic issue.

Outpatient and inpatient diabetes care delivery

Diabetes care is inherently complex – hence the need for 19 chapters of evidence review and recommendations in the Global Guideline. Pulling all the recommendations together to ensure the implementation of effective delivery of care therefore needs some organization of its own, as is discussed in this article. A special situation is that of people with diabetes in hospital, who are often subject to disruption of lifestyle due to illness, procedures, or surgery, with knock-on effects on their diabetes management.

National and regional organization: the key to effective diabetes care in Moscow

According to the federal statistics agency of the Russian Federation, the country’s population is in a phase of negative growth and currently stands at around 143 million. There are 2.3 million people registered with diabetes, 2 million of whom have type 2 diabetes. However, according to recent epidemiological research, there may be some 8 million people living with the condition in Russia. Success in addressing the problems relating to diabetes and its complications largely depends on the effective organization of diabetes care at regional and national levels.

Access to care - the key to development

Editorial

Glucose control: measures, levels and monitoring

Blood glucose control is central to the very nature of diabetes, and the late complications which can develop. Unfortunately, it cannot be sensed by the person with diabetes unless levels are very high or very low. Accordingly, blood glucose control has to be measured reliably, and this needs to be done in the clinic and in normal life. Evidently, the results have then to be related to the risks of developing complications – hence targets and intervention levels.

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