Education

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Focus on the front line: Diabetes South Africa

Diabetes is emerging as a serious public-health problem in South Africa, particularly in the urban areas, where social welfare and health systems are precarious, and there is a lack of access to appropriate health information. Diabetes South Africa (DSA), established in 1969, advocates for the rights of all people with diabetes in the country.

Diabetes management in a primary care setting: the Kenyatta National Hospital

Diabetes is increasingly common worldwide, and Kenya is no exception. The Ministry of Health estimates the prevalence of diabetes to be around 10% (3.5 million people). The cause of much human suffering, diabetes also places a considerable economic burden on individuals and families, and healthcare systems.

From research to policy: the development of a national diabetes programme in Cameroon

Ten years ago, without evidence to suggest otherwise, diabetes was not considered a public priority in Cameroon; the emphasis of Government health policy was on tackling the HIV/AIDS epidemic and attempting to eradicate communicable diseases. Efforts had been made to set up centres specializing in diabetes and hypertension, but without the backing of a national diabetes programme, most of these closed within a few years. The lack of data on non-communicable diseases constituted a major roadblock to the development of any such programme.

Toward a better future in Morocco

The rise in the number of people with diabetes in Morocco reflects current global trends. In step with the sharp and ongoing increase in levels of obesity in the urban populations, the prevalence of diabetes is rising. But while the threat of a full-blown diabetes epidemic in Morocco is growing, many people with the condition receive inadequate care as a result of shortages in human and medical resources, poor clinical facilities, and a lack of diabetes education.

Our time to choose

Editorial

Developing a comprehensive professional diabetes education programme

Optimal diabetes outcomes depend on a lifetime of appropriate care, including self-care, education and management. Health professionals require a body of knowledge and skills in order to provide effective diabetes care, education and management. In 2002, a step towards assisting healthcare professionals to gain that knowledge was taken by the International Diabetes Federation’s Consultative

Answering the urgent need for diabetes care personnel in northern India

Nobody can single-handedly manage the many and diverse aspects of diabetes. To be effective, diabetes care requires the coordinated input of people with diabetes and a range of healthcare providers, including a diabetes nurse, dietician, psychologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist or podiatrist, among others. Close

The Kahnawake Schools Project: diabetes prevention in the Mohawk community

Type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among Aboriginal people in Canada – around 15% of the Aboriginal population from 15 years and older. During the 1980s, healthcare providers at the local hospital in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory near Montreal, Quebec, noticed high rates of diabetes among people with cardiovascular

Preventing non-communicable diseases: an integrated community approach

The drastic rise in childhood obesity worldwide reflects the impact of unhealthy modern lifestyles. Over the last decade and a half, the increase of high-sugar, high-fat processed foods in our diets has combined with sedentary behaviour to radically and negatively affect the health of our societies. Initiatives are urgently required which can reduce the resulting individual and societal burden to physical and psychological health and economic development.

Building Blocks in diabetes care and prevention in Paraguay

An ongoing initiative of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization focuses on the development of basic procedures to improve diabetes prevention and control: the Building Blocks project. A set of diabetes care guidelines based on the Building Blocks principles resulted from a number of regional workshops involving experts in a variety of diabetes-related fields

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