Education

English

Focus on the front line: the role of pharmacists in diabetes care

The effective delivery of health care requires a partnership between people and their health-care providers. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of diabetes care, this team-based approach is appropriate. Indeed, a multidisciplinary team approach involving people with diabetes and health-care providers, such as nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and physicians, has been proven to result in lower average levels of blood glucose, a reduction in diabetes complications, and improved quality of life.

Footcare education for people with diabetes: a major challenge

Although diabetes-related amputations are preventable, for too many people around the world, losing a limb or part of a limb is a tragic consequence of having diabetes. The high rates of these amputations are an indication of inadequacies in the delivery of health care, which create enormous challenges for those attempting to access high quality foot education and care. In this article, Margaret McGill focuses on current recommendations for health-care providers and makes a call for an individualized approach to diabetes foot care.

Understanding the development of diabetic foot complications

Foot complications are the leading cause of hospitalization in people with diabetes. Losing a limb is one of the most dreaded complications of the condition – with reason: compared to those without the condition, people with diabetes have a 15-fold increased risk of suffering an amputation. In this article, Vilma Urbancic-Rovan describes the pathophysiology of diabetes foot damage and argues that the amputation rate could be significantly reduced with improved care and education for people with the condition.

Diabetes foot damage in developing countries: the urgent need for education

Figures released by the International Diabetes Federation suggest that worldwide in 2003 there were almost 200 million people with diabetes – a global prevalence of 5.1%. The report predicted that over the coming decade, the greatest increases in the numbers of people with the condition will occur in Africa and Asia, provoking hugely increased rates of death and disability. Diabetes foot complications constitute a major public health problem, particularly for people with diabetes in developing countries. In this article, Zulfiqarali Abbas and Stephan Morbach look

The dietetics of smoking cessation in people with diabetes

Compared to people without the condition, people with diabetes are at increased risk from vascular diseases – including heart attack and stroke. This risk is further increased in people with diabetes who smoke; smokers with the condition should be advised by their health carers to stop smoking as a matter of urgency. But giving up the habit is not easy. Successful cessation requires people to surmount a number of difficulties, including strong physical, psychological and behavioural

The diabetic foot: epidemiology, risk factors and the status of care

The development of foot problems is not an inevitable consequence of having diabetes. Indeed, most foot lesions are preventable. However, recent statistics are somewhat depressing: approximately a quarter of all people with diabetes worldwide at some point during their lifetime will develop sores or breaks (ulcers) in the skin of their feet. Moreover, as the number of people with diabetes rises worldwide, there can be little doubt that the burden of diabetes-related foot

Keeping people's feet perfect

Guest editor's editorial

Project HOPE Mexico: empowering people to care for themselves and others

If current trends continue, within the next 10 years, a quarter of all people in Mexico will be living with diabetes. Diabetes already affects 12% of the general population and, astonishingly, one in three people over 65 years of age. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputations. Indeed, in 2004, diabetes was declared the leading cause of death in Mexico due to its link

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.

Diabetes education in Africa: what we need to know

Education is the cornerstone of diabetes care and management. Yet while many health-care professionals subscribe to this idea, it is not applied universally. In developing countries in particular, much work remains to be done in order to improve the content, structure and provision of diabetes education. Margueritte de Clerck looks at education needs in Africa and makes some recommendations on the role and responsibilities of fellow health-care professionals, particularly those who work in low-income countries.

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