Education

English

Skills, strategies and sunshine: education in the Carribean

According to Diabetes Atlas 2000, there are 21.4 million people with diabetes living in the North American region of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Prevalence rates of diabetes are high in this region as compared to Europe and Africa. The Caribbean countries in particular have a disproportionately high number of inhabitants with diabetes. Indeed, several islands in the Caribbean rank in the top 10 of all IDF member countries in terms of diabetes prevalence. The need for diabetes education in the region is therefore high.

Setting the standards in England

In England we are currently increasing public spending on health faster than any major country in Europe. But, along with investing more, we need to do things differently. We need to look more radically at how health services are provided within a network of health and social care, shifting the balance between what we do in hospitals and what we do elsewhere. These are the principles that we will apply to modernizing diabetes treatment and that will underpin the ongoing work of the National Service Frameworks (NSF).

The impact of diabetes on family life

Children need a healthy mother, not one with incapacitating complications, an unstable character due to the highs and lows of blood glucose levels, or who might endanger them by losing control while having a severe hypoglycaemic reaction. Children need a full-time caregiver. A responsible woman educated to take command of her diabetes can fulfil this role just as well as a woman without diabetes; sometimes even better.

A world-wide call to action

The scale of the problem that diabetes poses to world health is still widely under-recognized. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that if current trends continue, the number of people with diabetes will almost double; from 194 million people in 2003 to 333 million by the year 2025. Diabetes is already the most costly health-care problem in the westernized and 'westernizing' countries.

Helping people with diabetes: a rewarding task for the PUMCH Diabetes Education Centre in China

Diabetes has ‘arrived’ in China. This condition was relatively rare among the Chinese population until 20 years ago. As life has become more and more westernized and industrial, the prevalence of diabetes has increased rapidly. The average prevalence rate has increased from just under 1 percent in 1980 to as high as nearly 7 percent in some areas in 1996. Chinese health resources are struggling to keep up with this explosion. However, the Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) have an education programme which is producing positive outcomes.

Becoming experts

Increasing the knowledge of people with diabetes gives them motivation and promotes better diabetes control. This, in turn, enhances quality of life and delays, if not totally prevents, the onset of complications. The Danish Diabetes Education Centre, opened in Odense, 1993, does just that, by providing teaching and assistance to people with diabetes and their friends and families. The centre educates over 500 people in total each year.

New roles in diabetes care

Empowerment is a philosophy that recognizes the fundamental right of people with diabetes to be the primary decision makers in the management of their condition. It represents a more compatible model of care and education needed for a self-managed illness such as diabetes.

Empowerment: a matter of choice

There has been an enormous change over the last 30 years in diabetes care and education in Germany and most of Western Europe. Nowadays, feelings of frustration have decreased for both healthcare professionals and people with diabetes, as it is finally becoming recognized just who is responsible for what.

Educating the educators: an International Curriculum for Health Professionals in Diabetes

The lack of trained healthcare professionals and of programmes to train them has been cited by many member associations of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) as the most critical issue hindering the delivery of high quality diabetes education and care. To address this, the IDF Consultative Section on Diabetes Education set out to write a curriculum that could be used in all IDF member countries. This goal has now been achieved. Read more for an overview of the most remarkable features of this new publication.

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

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