Education

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Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

Learning diabetes

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

First regional EMME camp for children with diabetes

Summer camps provide an opportunity for children with diabetes to learn more about their condition in a safe and caring environment. Under the supervision of a dedicated staff, an enjoyable, well-structured educational programme of activities makes for a truly worthwhile event. This article reports on the experience of the first Eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (EMME) regional camp.

IDF and WHO initiatives to put diabetes on the health agenda in Africa

Although the exact magnitude of the problem in Africa is not well understood, diabetes is a serious threat to public health throughout the continent. In 2003, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) predicted that by 2010, diabetes prevalence in Africa would increase by around 95%. Ignoring diabetes could lead to the breakdown of the fragile health systems in Africa, which are already overwhelmed by communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Diabetes and the World Health Organization

The aim of the World Health Organization (WHO) is the achievement of the highest possible level of health for all the world's people. From its global headquarters in Geneva and its Regional Offices, it assists national governments achieve this aim by setting international norms and standards, and providing leadership and technical support. WHO has substantial influence and prestige and has several major accomplishments to its credit, most notably the global eradication of smallpox in 1979, and major reductions in the burden of polio, leprosy, river blindness and tuberculosis.

WDF and diabetes care in Tanzania: making a difference

The World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) is dedicated to supporting prevention and management of diabetes in the developing world. Accordingly it funds sustainable projects in education, capacity building, and distribution and procurement of essential medical supplies. WDF creates partnerships and acts as a catalyst to help others

Better product information: is direct advertising the answer?

In the last few years, there has been an important but little-publicized

Awareness and education in Egypt: the DELTA project

Egypt and some of the Gulf countries have among the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world, notably Type 2 diabetes. Changes in socio-economic patterns, relatively rapid urbanization, and a 'fast-food culture' are taking their toll. In Egypt and the Gulf region, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now a major health problem, and high blood cholesterol levels and hypertension are recognized as 'silent killers'. However, there is relatively little awareness of the serious threat to health presented by diabetes, or its role in causing CVD.

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.

Primary care in Tunisia: improving diabetes management

Tunisia, like most countries of the world, is experiencing an alarming rise in the number of people with diabetes: the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in adults over 30 year of age rose from 4.2% in 1976 to 10% in 1995. In response, the Tunisian Ministry of Public Health have developed a National Programme of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) management in primary care. Initially introduced in 1993, the Programme was then implemented throughout the country in 1998.

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