Education

English

Better product information: is direct advertising the answer?

In the last few years, there has been an important but little-publicized

Awareness and education in Egypt: the DELTA project

Egypt and some of the Gulf countries have among the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world, notably Type 2 diabetes. Changes in socio-economic patterns, relatively rapid urbanization, and a 'fast-food culture' are taking their toll. In Egypt and the Gulf region, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now a major health problem, and high blood cholesterol levels and hypertension are recognized as 'silent killers'. However, there is relatively little awareness of the serious threat to health presented by diabetes, or its role in causing CVD.

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.

Primary care in Tunisia: improving diabetes management

Tunisia, like most countries of the world, is experiencing an alarming rise in the number of people with diabetes: the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in adults over 30 year of age rose from 4.2% in 1976 to 10% in 1995. In response, the Tunisian Ministry of Public Health have developed a National Programme of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) management in primary care. Initially introduced in 1993, the Programme was then implemented throughout the country in 1998.

Staged Diabetes Management in Mexico: optimizing care with limited resources

In 1997, diabetes became the third leading cause of death in Mexico. This is a national phenomenon. Regardless of geography or the rural or urban nature of their populations, deaths due to diabetes have increased in 28 of the 32 states in Mexico. Conservative estimates place the current rate of diabetes prevalence at 7.4% among people aged 20-79 years. Estimates from other sources are even higher. Clearly diabetes has become one of the principle public health problems in the country.

Why developing countries need access to cheap treatments for diabetes

There is still a widespread misconception that non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are not relevant to poor people in developing countries. For these people, medicines for the treatment of such conditions are regarded almost as a luxury. Scientific evidence testifies to the contrary. Non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are escalating in developing countries. This is giving rise to severe economic as well as human consequences. An effective public health strategy for poor countries requires continued access to low-cost, high-quality generic medicines.

Exploring the world mythology of diabetes

Myths are defined on the one hand as traditional stories concerning the early history of people or explaining a natural or social phenomenon; alternatively they represent a widely held but false belief. There are many half-truths, exaggerations and distortions of reality surrounding diabetes which fall into both of these categories. Myths, often passed from generation to generation as oral history, represent a link between the past and present generations. As such, they often contain elements of the truth.

Diabetes education: training trainers in the Caribbean

The people of the Caribbean region are facing a serious threat to health which will potentially overwhelm healthcare systems in the small and relatively poor countries of the region. It is estimated that by the year 2010, the number of people with diabetes in the Caribbean will reach 20 million. Diabetes prevalence in the area is projected to increase to approximately 25% of the adult population.

International Standards for Diabetes Education

As the number of people with diabetes increases worldwide, there will be an increasing need for diabetes education. New approaches are necessary to ensure the cost-effective provision of this education for each person with diabetes. Diabetes education will be offered by both health-care professionals and non-professionals. New programmes will be developed and non-medical educators will receive training in order to deliver diabetes education.

Pages