Exploring ethnicity in people with type 2 diabetes in Australia

In 2011, the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Diabetes Centre in Sydney, Australia, joined the voluntary network of International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Centres of Education. There are currently eight such centres providing excellent diabetes care and education services in Latin America, Asia (including the Indian sub-continent and China), Europe and now Australia. Central to the aims of the Centres of Education are efforts to increase regional capacity to respond to the diabetes epidemic.

The key to managing diabetes without tears – the treatment and teaching programme for flexible insulin therapy in Germany

Successful implementation of structured education programmes that teach people with type 1 diabetes to use insulin flexibly around normal

Positive results in Australia – OzDAFNE takes up the challenge

Australian diabetes healthcare professionals in Melbourne learned about the DAFNE programme for people with type 1 diabetes in 2004, during a visit to the International Diabetes Institute there by Stephanie Amiel. Rather like the UK teams a few years earlier, a teamof nine health professionals from four Australian centres undertook DAFNE training in the UK that year. Prior to this, there were no evidence-based group programmes providing structured education for people with type 1 in Australia.

Key questions about diabetes education in Guatemala – for whom, what kind and how to provide it?

The Guatemalan Ministry of Public Health puts the prevalence of diabetes in urban areas of the country at around 8%.Diabetes complications have become a primary cause of death and disability and an increasing burden to individuals, families, society in general and the economy of the country.

A multi-partner approach to developing excellence in diabetes management training in four African countries

Human resources for healthcare in West Africa are among the world’s most limited, severely restricting the capacity of countries in the region to provide effective, equitable public health services to their people. Indeed, the lack of health professionals throughout sub-Saharan Africa has become a significant barrier to achieving the UN’s millennium development goals.

Diabetes education for people with type 2 – a European perspective

Therapeutic diabetes education is a prerequisite for the effective management of type 2 diabetes. Yet in several European countries, diabetes education remains insufficiently implemented. While effective educational programmes have been developed and evaluated in a number of countries, funding for implementation is still inadequate. Although improvements have been made in recent decades, there is still a long way to go to meet the Europe-wide need for diabetes education. Monika Grüsser reports on some developments to date.

Mobile phone movie making: the Samadhan System of diabetes education

Diabetes education is an effective intervention in the prevention and management of diabetes and also plays an important role in the management of prediabetes conditions like obesity and hypertension. Multiple studies have found that diabetes self-management education is associated with improved diabetes knowledge and selfcare behaviour, improved clinical outcomes, such as lower HbA1c, lower self-reported weight, improved quality of life, healthy coping and lower costs.

Promoting foot care education in developing countries: the Caribbean Diabetic Foot Care Programme

There are 285 million people living with diabetes worldwide, the number of affected people is predicted to reach 438 million by 2030. Because of the rapid increase in diabetes prevalence, the number of diabetes complications is rising equally quickly. Amputation is one of the most feared of these complications. People with diabetes are at risk for nerve damage and problems with the supply of blood to their feet. Nerve damage results in a reduced ability to feel pain and, as a consequence, injuries often go unnoticed. Moreover, poor blood supply can slow down the process of wound healing.

Diabetes self-management education and support: the key to diabetes care

Diabetes education can be delivered using a variety of methods and in a range of settings: a lecture on, say, carbohydrates and glucose monitoring; an individual face-to-face meeting with an educator or a dietitian; a group session where an educator and people with diabetes can all act as educational resources. It can take place  in a classroom, an office or under a tree, supported by professionally produced photographs and posters or hand-drawn signs.

The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative - tackling type 2 diabetes in Canada

In 2005, the Government of Canada provided a renewed investment of 190 million CAD over five years to maintain and enhance the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative. The main goal of the Initiative is to reduce type 2 diabetes and its complications through a range of culturally relevant health promotion and prevention services, delivered by trained health service providers and diabetes workers. Supported by Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative funding, Aboriginal communities across Canada are working to prevent and  manage type 2 diabetes. Amy Bell reports.