Education

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The importance of a proactive response to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

People  with  diabetes  face  a  range  of challenges. Having the condition affects all areas of life; a number of psychological and emotional factors are involved. Recently, one of the authors of this article, Robin Wynyard, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The shock of being diagnosed provoked in him and his partner, Sue Shea, negative feelings that included fear, anxiety and uncertainty – a common emotional response which often goes unreported in the related literature.

The IDF framework for diabetes education - current status and future prospects

The type 2 diabetes epidemic is having a growing impact on individuals, communities, healthcare systems and national economies. There are an estimated 246 million people worldwide diagnosed with some form of diabetes; it is estimated that, by 2025, this number will grow to 380 million. In developing regions, the growth rate of diabetes is 70%, which is greater than that in other parts of the world.

Diabetes and visual impairment - identifying needs, ensuring full accessibility

Many people with diabetes live with some form of visual impairment due to a variety of possible causes. Visual impairment due to diabetic retinopathy is a long-term complication of the condition. Diabetes also raises the risk for visual impairment due to cataracts, glaucoma and stroke. Age-related macular degeneration is not caused by diabetes, but like type 2diabetes, it occurs more frequently as people age, and many people have both.

Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

Meeting very special needs

President's editorial

The DAWN verdict on diabetes support in schools: could do better

Because their condition affects every aspect of their daily  life, children and adolescents with diabetes are faced with more problems than are many of their peers without diabetes. The greater part of their day is spent at school, and this is where many of the greatest problems lie. Dealing with diabetes in school is one of the most important topics in the daily life of many families. The 2007 online WebTalk survey, conducted in eight countries as part of the DAWN Youth survey, has contributed to an increased understanding of the issues faced by children and adolescents with diabetes.

Peer support and positive results in Germany - repeating success at my Camp D

Recently, for the second time in 2 years, several hundred young people with diabetes were brought together with diabetes educators, diabetologists and employees of Novo Nordisk, in Bad Segeberg, Germany, to attend a diabetes camp that combined education and leisure pursuits with a strong emphasis on peer support. The 700 or so 16- to 25-year-olds from Germany, Austria and Switzerland were supported by 150 experienced diabetes support personnel; 35 diabetologists and psychologists were available at all times to resolve doubts and queries and resolve concerns.

Addressing shortcomings in diabetes care and school support in Spain

The DAWN Youth WebTalk survey in Spain demonstrated that, as is the case elsewhere, children with diabetes in this country suffer psychological problems; emotional well-being is low, while depression and anxiety are present in around 30% of the young people surveyed. The strong demand for psychological support was common to all of the survey groups. Children with diabetes and their parents and healthcare professionals reported that unresolved social and psychological issues lead to inadequate metabolic control in 26% of children and adolescents with diabetes.

Driving research and action for long-term improvements in Denmark

A growing body of evidence confirms that in order to improve health outcomes, a transformation is required in the understanding and perceptions of the psychosocial issues that face all people with diabetes. In young people with the condition, these are exacerbated by the multi-dimensional challenges inherent in childhood and adolescent development. As in many other countries, a gap exists in Denmark between the psychosocial issues affecting children and adolescents with diabetes and current treatment practices.

From research to response in Italy - working alongside the Ministry of Health

People with diabetes require a range of interventions to manage their condition – medical treatment in isolation is not enough. In order to achieve optimum blood glucose control, the psychological, social and emotional aspects of living with diabetes also require at-tention. Diabetes and its related human, social and economic effects are important issues for the Ministry of Health in Italy. The Ministry’s commission on diabetes is engaged in developing plans to improve primary and secondary prevention and care of the condition.

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