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Advocacy, training and tools to improve psychosocial support for children with diabetes

Since its launch in 2006, DAWN Youth has worked to complement a number of existing programmes in the USA which contribute to the well-being of young people with diabetes. The US WebTalk survey recorded first-hand testimonies from young people with diabetes, their parents and healthcare professionals on what it means to live with diabetes. As in all  participating countries, schools were identified as a key area for improvement in the USA. This article outlines two of the initiatives of DAWN Youth USA, which may be a source of  ideas for action and improvement in other countries.

Promoting opportunities, fighting against isolation in India

India is undergoing an economic transformation – a financial boom according to many. Among India’s strong points contributing to this positive economic climate is its enormous young population. The potential for productivity, savings and investments by this generation will increase in the future, and is driving up levels of investments and confidence in the Indian economy. However, such gains are cancelled out to a large degree by excessive healthcare spending.

The Border Health Strategic Initiative: addressing health disparities in border communities

Approximately 13 million people reside in the 80 Mexican municipalities and 48 US counties located along the US-Mexico border; 86% of those people live in 14 pairs of sister cities – metropolitan areas divided by the frontier. Border residents share similar resources and environmental problems. Issues of great concern include air quality, the availability and quality of water, and animal control. The communities along the border are economically and socially interdependent, with more than a million legal north- and southbound crossings every day.

South African children at risk for future diseases: the way forward

South Africa is a land of paradoxes. South Africans deservedly celebrated an exceptional Rugby World Cup victory in 2007, but we most definitely are not yet winning the battle against inactivity and overweight among the nation’s young people – which is placing them at substantial risk for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. South Africa has the added challenge of dealing with a double burden of disease: the chronic non-communicable diseases mentioned above and communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.

Preparing a global healthcare workforce for the challenge of chronic conditions

Chronic conditions are increasing. The number of people affected by chronic non-communicable conditions, including diabetes and heart disease, is growing worldwide. Collectively, chronic conditions were responsible for 35 million – a full 60% – of all deaths in 2005. This is twice the number of deaths due to infectious diseases, poor maternal health and malnutrition combined. In addition to causing high death rates, chronic conditions account for almost half of the world’s disability.

Improving self-efficacy in the search for cost-effective solutions - the Indonesian experience

The burden of diabetes has increased dramatically in most developed countries and in many developing countries. People’s perceptions and knowledge about their diabetes, as well as other psychological factors, are important predictors for the success of diabetes self-management. Indonesia’s population of more than 240 million people faces a wide range of health problems – both communicable and non-communicable diseases – which are placing a huge burden on the country’s healthcare sector.


Enhancing literacy and life skills among people with diabetes in Argentina

Around 780 million adults worldwide – most of them living in developing countries – are locked into a life of isolation and poverty because they cannot read or write. In people with diabetes, low literacy severely complicates the day-to-day management of their condition or, indeed, entirely precludes effective self-care – in many cases leading to tragic consequences.


The Alphabet Strategy: an evidence-based approach to diabetes care

Meeting the needs of people with diabetes is complicated and demanding for both people with the condition and their healthcare providers. Moreover, diabetes is expensive, and costs are rising worldwide. Diabetes healthcare providers in all

Addressing barriers to care in elderly African-American women in rural areas

Diabetes is a major health concern; 246 million people are diagnosed and living with the disease worldwide. The growing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is correlated with the ongoing rise in obesity. In the USA, where diabetes is the fifth-leading cause of death, the number of people with the condition has tripled in the last 30 years. The number of people with the condition is set to increase in coming years as populations age.

Small-scale strategies to improve diabetes awareness in those who need it most

After only a few hours at an outpatient diabetes clinic in Tanzania, it becomes apparent to any observer that most people with diabetes arrive unaccompanied. The lack of affordable transportation forces people to visit the clinics alone. Unfortunately, such behaviour not only fosters a lack of support from the family but also creates a gap between the family and the healthcare provider. When it comes to managing diabetes at a population level, a team approach is necessary that includes people with diabetes, their family and their healthcare providers.

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