Complications > Foot


Achieving excellence in diabetes foot care: one step at a time

By the time you finish reading this paragraph, it is likely that at least one person has lost part of a foot or leg through diabetic foot disease. This happens every 30 seconds. An amputation is often preceded by an ulcer; 15% of people with diabetes are affected by a foot ulcer at some time in their life. With the global diabetes population set to rise to 333 million by 2025, there is an urgent need for a co-ordinated preventive clinical response to reduce the impact of the diabetic foot.

How does smoking affect insulin sensitivity?

It is well known that tobacco smoke is harmful to health and is of particular danger to people with diabetes. All of the chronic complications of diabetes – such as cardiovascular disease, foot problems, kidney disease, and eye damage – are exacerbated by breathing in tobacco smoke. Recently, it was suggested that smoking may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the exact mechanisms are not yet fully understood, it has been suggested that impaired sensitivity to the action of insulin in people who smoke tobacco could be linked to

The year of the diabetic foot

The human and economic consequences of the diabetic foot are extreme. Due to various complications of diabetes, a person’s foot can become vulnerable. Nerve

Focus on the people

President's editorial

On your feet

Despite substantial advances following the St Vincent Declaration, the goal of reducing amputations by 50 percent has not yet been reached. ‘On your feet!’ was the title given to a workshop on the diabetic foot, held at the German Diabetes Society Congress last year.

The next step: the diabetic foot - costs, prevention and future policies

Of all the serious and costly complications affecting individuals with diabetes – heart disease, kidney failure and blindness – foot complications take the greatest toll.

The EASD 37th annual meeting in Glasgow

The 37th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) from 9-13 September, hosted by Diabetes UK, was the biggest meeting of the EASD to date. Ten thousand people in total attended the array of satellite symposia, lectures, poster sessions and the exhibition. However, the news of the terrorist attack in New York, shocking to everyone, dampened proceedings and caused logistical chaos for the American delegation. Following is a brief overview of some of the many interesting topics presented at the meeting.

A united stand on the diabetic foot: ISDF 2003

Too many of the nearly 200 million people in the world with diabetes suffer from diabetes-related foot complications. As a result, the impact on their quality of life is massive. The loss of a foot or part of a leg is the devastating end result of one