Complications > Cardiovascular disease

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Time to plot a safe course

President's editorial

Preventing vascular diseases in the emerging world: a multidisciplinary approach

From December 12-15, leaders from the International Society of Nephrology, the International Society of Hypertension, the World Heart Federation, the International Diabetes Federation, and the International Atherosclerosis Society met for a three-day conference on the prevention of vascular diseases, namely diabetes, kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. The aims of the meeting were to bring together all the vascular specialties to lay out the parameters of the chronic disease problem and seek ways to reduce their burden particularly in the developing world.

Worsening the blow: the effects of smoking on diabetes complications

Cigarette smoking is a serious hazard to health. Yet, although as a group people with diabetes are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, this does not appear to influence smoking habits among them. Tobacco use among people with diabetes is strongly associated with a further increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular complications. Furthermore, research has indicated that smoking has negative effects on the metabolism of glucose and lipids (fat), leading

Blood fats: a toxic meal-time tide

Eating is a pleasant necessity for most of us. We eat our food, the gastro-intestinal tract (gut) directs nutrients to the blood stream, and excess energy is stored for later use. Much of what is known about the mechanisms that regulate these processes has been learned from diabetes research. Because diabetes has always been regarded as a disease of glucose metabolism, the research has been focussed on the intake and processing of glucose. Jacqueline Dekker looks at the role of fats (lipids) in the processes that give rise to diabetes-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Blood glucose levels after meals: all important?

While it is known that people with diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the factors which contribute to this state are not fully understood. In this article, Antonio Ceriello examines the importance of the post-meal functioning of the body in the development of heart disease.

How does smoking affect insulin sensitivity?

It is well known that tobacco smoke is harmful to health and is of particular danger to people with diabetes. All of the chronic complications of diabetes – such as cardiovascular disease, foot problems, kidney disease, and eye damage – are exacerbated by breathing in tobacco smoke. Recently, it was suggested that smoking may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the exact mechanisms are not yet fully understood, it has been suggested that impaired sensitivity to the action of insulin in people who smoke tobacco could be linked to

Cause as well as effect: smoking and diabetes

People who smoke tobacco are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Tobacco use contributes to the risk of all the major types of cardiovascular disease, particularly heart attack, stroke and the blockage of blood vessels in the lower limbs. People with diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, are also at high risk for

Meal-time glucose control: the role of oral drugs

As a species, our condition has changed: from prolonged periods of fasting and occasional gorging, to nearly constant feeding with rarely occurring periods of fasting. The constant availability of ‘grazing opportunities’ has contributed to a change in the body build of humans towards increasing body weight, overweight, and obesity. With this change has come a massive increase in the number of people with diabetes and diabetes- and- obesity-related health problems.

Insulin resistance: the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease

As everyone with diabetes knows, insulin is the most important hormone controlling the blood glucose level, with effects particularly directed to muscle, fat and liver. It has been known for several decades that a poor response of the body’s tissues to insulin – called ‘insulin resistance’ – is of major importance in the development of type 2 diabetes. Many people develop insulin resistance and have a significant metabolic disturbance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

World Diabetes Day 2001: diabetes and cardiovascular disease

Reducing the Burden: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease was the theme of World Diabetes Day this year, celebrated on 14 November, a date that has become central to the whole diabetes world. The date was chosen several years ago to commemorate the birth of Frederick Banting, the first who conceived the idea which lead to the discovery of insulin in 1921.

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