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The Jaipur Foot: an effective low-cost prosthesis for people with diabetes

In people with diabetes, optimal management of their condition, regular examinations, the use of adequate footwear, and education are the best strategies to prevent diabetes-related foot problems, such as ulceration. If foot problems cannot be prevented, these should be treated as early as possible. However, in many cases, some degree of amputation of lower limbs cannot be avoided. In people who undergo a major amputation, artificial limbs are required to enable them to continue normal daily life.

Prevention and management of diabetes: the role of the physiotherapist

As the diabetes epidemic grows in size and complexity, there is an increasing realization that physicians alone are unable to provide the care required by people with diabetes. To help them live life to the fullest, people with the condition need the services of a range of healthcare personnel, including diabetes nurses, dietitians, podiatrists, psychologists and eye specialists. The role of most of these is well defined; the multi-disciplinary team approach benefits increasing numbers of people with diabetes worldwide.

From adolescence to adulthood: the transition from child to adult care

Adolescence, the period of transition from childhood to adulthood, is a key phase of human development. It is characterized by rapid changes – physical, sexual, psychological, emotional, cognitive, and social. The psychological imbalance that prevails during adolescence is particularly significant in people with diabetes as it often leads to a decline in self-care. This brings about a deterioration in blood glucose control, and creates difficulties that hamper the development of harmonious relationships between the young person with diabetes and his or her healthcare providers.

Guideline for the management of post-meal blood glucose

Diabetes is a leading cause of death in most developed countries, and has become a serious epidemic in many developing and newly industrialized nations. Currently, an estimated 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. Poorly controlled diabetes is associated with disabling and potentially life-threatening complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, nerve damage and cardiovascular disease. Until recently, lowering fasting and pre-meal glucose levels was a key focus of diabetes management.

Translating science into practice: the US National Diabetes Education Program

The USA ranks third in the global prevalence of diabetes, preceded only by India and China. About 7% of the population has diabetes. A third of the total number of people with the condition is believed to be undiagnosed and therefore not receiving treatment to reduce the risk of disabling and life-threatening diabetes complications. The economic costs of diabetes are enormous – estimated at 132 billion USD in 2002. The mission of the US National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is to reduce diabetes-related illness and death.

Convivencias: a low-cost model for holistic diabetes education

The objective of holiday camps for children and adolescents with diabetes is to create an environment in which they can learn to embrace their condition and its treatment. Achieving and maintaining good blood glucose control is a key aim; the camps provide excellent opportunities for young people to learn and practise diabetes skills and become familiar with the latest techniques.

Delivering diabetes care to people with intellectual disability

Typically, people with learning difficulties due to intellectual disability face a variety of daily challenges, and require continual support from specialized carers. If they are affected by a chronic medical condition, such as diabetes, people with intellectual disability require coordinated support from diabetes-aware carers and informed healthcare providers.

Learning the lessons - preventing type 2 diabetes in Nepal

Diabetes has become a significant public health problem in urban Nepal. Studies carried out by the Nepal Diabetes Association in towns and cities throughout the country have revealed a diabetes prevalence of around 15% among people aged 20 years and above, and 19% among people aged 40 years and above. The Association has identified a number of key issues which continue to exacerbate this epidemic in Nepal.

The impact of a low-fat vegan diet on people with type 2 diabetes

Typical diets for people with type 2 diabetes limit carbohydrates, reduce calories to facilitate weight loss, and limit saturated fats to reduce cardiovascular risk. These dietary changes are logical and sometimes helpful. For many people, however, this sort of change leads to no more than modest weight loss and a small improvement in blood glucose control. In this article, Neal Barnard looks at evidence to suggest there might be a more effective nutritional approach to prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

Helping people in times of crisis - mobilizing the power of humanity

Average temperatures are rising due primarily to the release of increased amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases through the burning of fossil fuels. This is provoking other changes, including rising sea levels and changes in rainfall. These changes appear to be increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events – floods, droughts, heat waves, hurricanes, and tornados – which have the potential to provoke large-scale human crises.

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