Health Delivery

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Diabetes care in Sudan: emerging issues and acute needs

Sudan is the largest country in Africa and one of the poorest in the world. Its population is estimated at around 37 million; the capital Khartoum, with approximately 6 million inhabitants, is growing rapidly. There are hundreds of ethnic and tribal divisions and language groups within the two distinct major cultures in Sudan – Arabs with Nubian roots and non-Arab Black Africans. The lack of effective collaboration among these groups continues to be a serious problem.

A diabetes strategy for Africa: investing in health, protecting our people

The burgeoning epidemic of diabetes in Africa will exact a terrible toll from the people and economies of the region. The costs of the condition and its complications are already unacceptably high. Every day in Africa, large numbers of children and adults die because they cannot pay for the insulin they need to survive; many more die before a diagnosis can be made. But diabetes can be controlled through relatively small investments and prevented entirely through simple cost-effective interventions.

Insensitivity to insulin and obesity: the underlying cause

In the late 20th century obesity became an epidemic. The importance of obesity as a risk factor for a number of conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, gallstones and certain cancers, is well documented. Often associated with insensitivity to insulin, obesity is clearly a key factor in the development of the metabolic syndrome – a risk for both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this article, Robert Eckel and Scott Grundy explore the underlying causes of obesity and insensitivity to insulin.

Diabetes care in Taiwan: a case-management initiative

Diabetes, now a global epidemic, is the fourth leading cause of death in Taiwan. The most recent epidemiological data demonstrated that the prevalence of diabetes is approaching 5% and that the number of people with diabetes in Taiwan

Fruit and vegetables and the prevention of non-communicable diseases

It is estimated that around 2 billion children and adolescents worldwide suffer from weight-related disorders. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than a billion people are overweight, at least 300 million of whom are obese. As societies continue to embrace unhealthy sedentary lifestyles, fuelled by high-fat, high-sugar processed foods, obesity-related disorders, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, are affecting increasing numbers of people at all levels of society and in almost all the countries in the world.

Developing a comprehensive professional diabetes education programme

Optimal diabetes outcomes depend on a lifetime of appropriate care, including self-care, education and management. Health professionals require a body of knowledge and skills in order to provide effective diabetes care, education and management. In 2002, a step towards assisting healthcare professionals to gain that knowledge was taken by the International Diabetes Federation’s Consultative

Answering the urgent need for diabetes care personnel in northern India

Nobody can single-handedly manage the many and diverse aspects of diabetes. To be effective, diabetes care requires the coordinated input of people with diabetes and a range of healthcare providers, including a diabetes nurse, dietician, psychologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist or podiatrist, among others. Close

The Kahnawake Schools Project: diabetes prevention in the Mohawk community

Type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among Aboriginal people in Canada – around 15% of the Aboriginal population from 15 years and older. During the 1980s, healthcare providers at the local hospital in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory near Montreal, Quebec, noticed high rates of diabetes among people with cardiovascular

Diabetes, the metabolic syndrome and the epidemic of cardiovascular disease

Over the last 30 to 40 years, the death rate from cardiovascular disease has been gradually falling in many countries in the developed world. Improved detection and treatment of high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, falling rates of smoking, and modern, efficient treatment of emergencies, such as heart attacks, have contributed to a steady decline in the numbers of people dying from cardiovascular conditions. However, according to Jonathan Shaw, this trend could be reversed at the next tick of the global clock.

The IDF definition: why we need a global consensus

There is a constellation of metabolic abnormalities which includes centrally distributed obesity, decreased levels of HDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia). This is known as the metabolic syndrome. Associated with a five-fold risk for type 2 diabetes and two- to three-fold increase in risk for cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome is now considered one of the principal public health issues of the

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