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Empowering children with diabetes and their parents

When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, the news usually comes as a shock to all family members. This often provokes a crisis which is associated with grief and sadness; a complex scenario emerges. Children with diabetes and their parents often feel overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge required to effectively manage the condition. Parents and children experience feelings of guilt. Parents sometimes feel they may have been able to prevent their child's diabetes; children may blame themselves for an illness, and perceive the condition and its treatment as a form of punishment.

Diabetes education: overcoming affective roadblocks

In diabetes care, the principal objective is to improve health outcomes and ensure the total well-being of people with the condition. In order to achieve this, it is important to reach the person beyond the laboratory results and blood glucose

Quality communication improving quality of life

The ultimate goal of diabetes care is to enhance the quality of life of people with the condition. Quality of life is increasingly used as a factor in the evaluation of the quality of care. The results of this evaluation are used by health-care providers in order to make recommendations for future care. Only the person receiving care is capable of evaluating their quality of life during and following medical care.

Understanding the psychological barriers to effective diabetes therapy

In order to minimize the risk of diabetes complications, effective therapy for people with Type 2 diabetes involves lifestyle changes and poly-pharmacy targeting levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat. However, the strict targets set in recent guidelines are seldom achieved by the majority of people with diabetes. Barriers to effective diabetes therapy have been identified within the organization of health care and in the interaction between health-care providers and people with

Plans to stop animal insulin production. Bad news for developing countries

For the West, the availability of animal insulin is a question of freedom of choice. However, it is the only way of survival for a number of people with diabetes in the developing world. Will the plea for help from the people with diabetes in the developing countries, in search of life, go unnoticed, unheard?

Diabetes education in the spotlight

The IDF Congress has historically served as an international forum for sharing scientific advances. For the first time in Congress history, education, nutrition and the psychosocial aspects of diabetes were showcased in a specific track and addressed in a plenary lecture at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City. The inclusion of these themes served as a reassuring confirmation that the world's diabetes experts recognize the relevance of education and psychosocial aspects in improving diabetes outcomes.

National diabetes centres guarantee better healthcare in Hungary

People with diabetes in Hungary have access to free insulin, subsidized medication and diabetes equipment within a healthcare system whereby diabetes care is provided mainly by General Practitioners (GPs). Only a small number of people with diabetes - those with type 1 and difficult type 2 cases - are treated at national diabetes centres. These diabetes centres however provide a guarantee for better healthcare for all by consulting with and organizing postgraduate training for family doctors.

Insulin resistance: the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease

As everyone with diabetes knows, insulin is the most important hormone controlling the blood glucose level, with effects particularly directed to muscle, fat and liver. It has been known for several decades that a poor response of the body’s tissues to insulin – called ‘insulin resistance’ – is of major importance in the development of type 2 diabetes. Many people develop insulin resistance and have a significant metabolic disturbance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Minneapolis shows the way in improving large-scale diabetes care

More than 16 million Americans have diabetes. It is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in the USA. The American Diabetes Association’s Provider Recognition Programme, launched in 1997 to encourage and set standards for comprehensive and quality healthcare for people with diabetes, is working. Minneapolis has created such a model which has achieved ADA recognition. The result has been a significant improvement in blood glucose control among the HMOs’ patients, as well as better screening for – and control of – related risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Turkey responds to St Vincent

In Anatolia, the quality of diabetes care is generally lower than in the rest of Turkey. Half the people with diabetes living in this region are not aware of their condition. Neither are many on any treatment. Since last year, prompted by the aims of the St Vincent Declaration, the South-eastern Anatolia Diabetes Project (GAPDIAB) has been in operation in response to this situation.

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