Health Delivery

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Latest studies clarify state of health in Bahrain

For the past few decades, the Government of Bahrain has been consistently and conscientiously updating the country’s healthcare system, endeavouring to keep up with the demands placed upon it. Luckily so, because, in 1994 it was found that the figures they had been dealing with were way off track. In 1989, a Committee for Primary Care was formed by the Government of Bahrain’s Ministry of Health, standardizing care through establishing rules and regulations to guide physicians treating people with diabetes.

Psychological insulin resistance: what do patients and providers fear most?

If insulin is such an effective drug, why are so many people with type 2 diabetes reluctant to take it, and sometimes really apprehensive, despite acknowledged poor outcomes on diet and oral blood glucose lowering agents? Are healthcare providers part of the problem? Is there such syndrome as Insulin Resistance (PIR)? For a better understanding of PIR, which is commonly observed as a problem in type 2 diabetes, we need to look beyond the demonstrated efficacy of insulin, and understand people’s beliefs, emotions and concerns regarding insulin treatment.

Obesity: how to respond to a huge challenge

People with obesity have been illustrated by artists throughout our modern cultural history. Who would not recognize the clearly overweight Milon Venus or obese women in paintings by Rubens? These people, however, were rather rare exceptions during times when labour required physical work and food shortage was much more common than in the present. Although we lack specific data, it is likely that the industrial revolution together with improved food hygiene were associated with an increase in the prevalence of obesity at least among those whose labour was physically less demanding.

Epidemiological studies lay the ground for Syrian diabetes campaign

As in many countries of the world, Syria, with its 16 million inhabitants, has witnessed a tremendous change in food habits and lifestyle within the last few decades. This has been reflected in the rise of metabolic diseases in general and diabetes in particular. Three studies have shown that the prevalence of diabetes in Syria is probably higher than published reports have claimed. One of the aims of the Syrian National Diabetes Programme, adopted in 1995, was to assess the national situation by carrying out epidemiological studies.

The next step: the diabetic foot - costs, prevention and future policies

Of all the serious and costly complications affecting individuals with diabetes – heart disease, kidney failure and blindness – foot complications take the greatest toll.

Insulin therapy: current views and new options

Since the discovery of insulin, treatment for diabetes has come a long way towards saving the lives of those affected. There are now many options which make diabetes care more convenient and comfortable. People with diabetes have become more and more responsible for their own care through the development of new knowledge and new possibilities. This article presents a brief commentary on what is now available in diabetes insulin treatment.

The case for and against screening for type 2 diabetes

The decision to screen for diabetes may seem an easy one to make as the condition is common, expensive, chronic and with a prognosis highly dependent on the correct treatment. On the other hand, there is a general lack of adequate screening tools, lack of knowledge regarding appropriate treatment, uncertainties regarding economic consequences and a total lack of knowledge regarding the psychological consequences of screening. Studies focusing on these issues should, therefore, be performed before systematic screening can be recommended.

Diabetes education with a Bali flavour

Diabetes is on the increase in Indonesia, with prevalence rates now at 4.6% compared with 2% to 3% just five years ago. This means that some four million people throughout Indonesia, from Sumatra to Irian Jaya, currently have the condition. Bali, an Indonesian island with three million inhabitants, has trained 86 diabetes educators since 1996. The educators, who come from all over the island, are expected to be able to return to their local areas and spread their knowledge about diabetes.

Diabetes guidelines for kids

Diabetes is one of the most common long-term progressive diseases of childhood. In many parts of the world Type 1 diabetes in children is increasing by 3% to 5% each year. Type 2 diabetes is also declaring itself in younger and younger age groups. These children have a lifetime of diabetes ahead of them. In an effort to contribute to an improvement in the care and quality of life of young people with diabetes, the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) recently published comprehensive consensus guidelines.

Urban India: a breeding ground for diabetes

The global prevalence of diabetes is set to double over the next 25 years. Developing countries like India, already top of the diabetes league, are expected to shoulder much of this burden. Epidemiological studies show that the prevalence of diabetes is particularly high in urban areas in India. Cities are also home to a large pool of people with a great risk of developing diabetes in the future.

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