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Helping people with diabetes: a rewarding task for the PUMCH Diabetes Education Centre in China

Diabetes has ‘arrived’ in China. This condition was relatively rare among the Chinese population until 20 years ago. As life has become more and more westernized and industrial, the prevalence of diabetes has increased rapidly. The average prevalence rate has increased from just under 1 percent in 1980 to as high as nearly 7 percent in some areas in 1996. Chinese health resources are struggling to keep up with this explosion. However, the Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) have an education programme which is producing positive outcomes.

New roles in diabetes care

Empowerment is a philosophy that recognizes the fundamental right of people with diabetes to be the primary decision makers in the management of their condition. It represents a more compatible model of care and education needed for a self-managed illness such as diabetes.

Empowerment: a matter of choice

There has been an enormous change over the last 30 years in diabetes care and education in Germany and most of Western Europe. Nowadays, feelings of frustration have decreased for both healthcare professionals and people with diabetes, as it is finally becoming recognized just who is responsible for what.

Gestational diabetes: what every mother needs to know

Gestational diabetes is diabetes which is diagnosed when a woman is pregnant. It may have been there before pregnancy without her knowing it, or it may have been brought about by the pregnancy itself. Either way, the woman needs to be as well informed about it as possible, as it can affect both her baby and herself on the short and long term.

45 years of improving care in Japan

2002 marked the 45th anniversary of the Japan Diabetes Society. The Society carries out diverse activities in support of basic and clinical research into diabetes, which is a major health burden in Japan. Indeed, recent research indicates that the Japanese are more likely than Europeans to develop Type 2 diabetes. Today there are 6.9 million people with diabetes in Japan. It is predicted that, if current lifestyle habits remain unchanged, there will be 10.8 million people with diabetes in the country by the year 2010.

The activities of Insulin for Life Australia

Insulin for Life (IFL) is a non-profit, Australian-based organization established in 1999. This unique initiative evolved from the 20-year programme at the International Diabetes Institute in Melbourne.

Is type 2 diabetes preventable? What the evidence-based guidelines say

Diabetes is the commonest non-communicable disease worldwide. Researchers predict it will increase by around 160% by the year 2025. Sadly, most of this increase will occur in developing countries, which have the least resources to deal with the problem. Even in the most developed countries, health systems are struggling to meet demands for services. In recent years, this has led to a strong focus on prevention research.

Cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention

Diabetes is one of the most costly diseases ever in both human and economic terms. To reduce today's burden and that on future generations, it is in everyone's interest that cost-effective measures to prevent diabetes are identified and implemented. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Diabetes Health Economics has just completed a review of the evidence on cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention. The timely publication shows that investment in diabetes care can be a cost-effective use of scarce resources. This article provides a brief summary.

Dedicated mothers: managing diabetes during pregnancy

Today, the chances of a successful pregnancy in a woman with diabetes are close to those of a woman without diabetes, providing diabetes and obstetric care is optimal. In other words, if a woman is able to look after her health, then in most cases diabetes should not prevent her from having a healthy baby.

Pre-pregnancy care

In women with diabetes who come late in their pregnancy for antenatal care, it is difficult to calculate how many weeks pregnant they are, and hence difficult to optimize the time of delivery. Serious complications of diabetes can deteriorate and there is a high incidence of major birth defects in the babies. These abnormalities arise in the first ten weeks of pregnancy, which may be before a woman even knows she is pregnant or before she would come for antenatal care.

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