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The challenge to movers and shakers: broad strategies to prevent obesity and diabetes

We know that in both Western and Asian adults in the vulnerable overweight groups with impaired glucose tolerance, modest weight loss with specific changes in diet and physical activity can reduce the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. Marked weight loss in severely obese people with diabetes can also ameliorate the risks from their diabetes perhaps for a decade or more. However, clinical interventions to achieve this require intensive personal supervision, which,

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

Going down: lipids and all that cholesterol

Diabetes prevention takes many forms. Other articles in this issue of Diabetes Voice describe primary prevention of Type 2 diabetes (the diabetes of obesity and Western lifestyles), while secondary prevention is the use of lifestyle

Successful multiple risk factor intervention in type 2 diabetes: the Steno-2 triumph

Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) between two- and six-fold, and shortens life expectancy by 5 to 10 years. Once a person with diabetes has developed severe vascular complications, they will

Clinical trials confirm that type 2 diabetes is preventable

Until recently, randomized clinical trials offered only limited proof that Type 2 diabetes is preventable by changes in lifestyle. Fortunately, this gap has now been filled. Several major lifestyle intervention trials have been successfully completed. The results are consistent: the risk of Type 2 diabetes can be halved in people who are at high risk; the effect of lifestyle change is rapid; the lifestyle changes required to achieve a significant risk reduction do not have to be drastic; and benefits are similar in different ethnic groups.

Drug development and diabetes: can we ensure an open environment for their data?

The development of new drugs might contribute to the defeat of some diseases, including diabetes, for which no cure has yet been found. New drugs are necessary and very welcome, provided that they are launched on the market following thorough, reliable and independent clinical evaluation of their safety and effectiveness. This article digs into this issue, providing an example of the repercussions that market pressures and inadequate clinical reporting have had in the lives of people with diabetes.

Lighting up diabetes in the Asian young: the ASDIAB study

Diabetes is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. The number of people with diabetes is currently estimated to amount to nearly 180 million in the over 140 IDF member countries. While a relatively large number of studies have so far been carried out into the causes and development of diabetes mellitus in the Caucasian populations, up until recently, data on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition in the Asian population was still relatively scarce. The Asian Young Diabetes (ASDIAB) Study, the most significant results of which are revealed below, was intended to fill this gap.

The changing face of diabetes: medical nutrition therapy

Previously disregarded due to the lack of strong clinical evidence supporting its effectiveness in the treatment of diabetes, the role of medical nutrition therapy has recently changed. This is all the more important given the link between diabetes and obesity, and the steady increase of the latter at a global level, particularly in the industrializing countries. So today, when advising on how to best manage the condition, diabetes healthcare teams are putting more and more emphasis on healthy lifestyles, of which nutrition is a major component.

Cognitive behaviour therapy: how to improve diabetes self-management

'It doesn't matter how hard I try, I'll still get the complications' is a typical example of how some people with diabetes feel when faced with the hardships of self-management and with the difficulty in controlling the condition despite all good intentions. It is, however, possible to escape from these negative feelings and gain renewed confidence in one's ability to manage diabetes, and in the positive impact of treatment on one's well-being, thanks to CBT – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

First regional EMME camp for children with diabetes

Summer camps provide an opportunity for children with diabetes to learn more about their condition in a safe and caring environment. Under the supervision of a dedicated staff, an enjoyable, well-structured educational programme of activities makes for a truly worthwhile event. This article reports on the experience of the first Eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (EMME) regional camp.

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