Health Delivery

English

Is type 2 diabetes preventable? What the evidence-based guidelines say

Diabetes is the commonest non-communicable disease worldwide. Researchers predict it will increase by around 160% by the year 2025. Sadly, most of this increase will occur in developing countries, which have the least resources to deal with the problem. Even in the most developed countries, health systems are struggling to meet demands for services. In recent years, this has led to a strong focus on prevention research.

Cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention

Diabetes is one of the most costly diseases ever in both human and economic terms. To reduce today's burden and that on future generations, it is in everyone's interest that cost-effective measures to prevent diabetes are identified and implemented. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Diabetes Health Economics has just completed a review of the evidence on cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention. The timely publication shows that investment in diabetes care can be a cost-effective use of scarce resources. This article provides a brief summary.

Dedicated mothers: managing diabetes during pregnancy

Today, the chances of a successful pregnancy in a woman with diabetes are close to those of a woman without diabetes, providing diabetes and obstetric care is optimal. In other words, if a woman is able to look after her health, then in most cases diabetes should not prevent her from having a healthy baby.

Pre-pregnancy care

In women with diabetes who come late in their pregnancy for antenatal care, it is difficult to calculate how many weeks pregnant they are, and hence difficult to optimize the time of delivery. Serious complications of diabetes can deteriorate and there is a high incidence of major birth defects in the babies. These abnormalities arise in the first ten weeks of pregnancy, which may be before a woman even knows she is pregnant or before she would come for antenatal care.

The challenge to movers and shakers: broad strategies to prevent obesity and diabetes

We know that in both Western and Asian adults in the vulnerable overweight groups with impaired glucose tolerance, modest weight loss with specific changes in diet and physical activity can reduce the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. Marked weight loss in severely obese people with diabetes can also ameliorate the risks from their diabetes perhaps for a decade or more. However, clinical interventions to achieve this require intensive personal supervision, which,

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

Going down: lipids and all that cholesterol

Diabetes prevention takes many forms. Other articles in this issue of Diabetes Voice describe primary prevention of Type 2 diabetes (the diabetes of obesity and Western lifestyles), while secondary prevention is the use of lifestyle

Successful multiple risk factor intervention in type 2 diabetes: the Steno-2 triumph

Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) between two- and six-fold, and shortens life expectancy by 5 to 10 years. Once a person with diabetes has developed severe vascular complications, they will

Clinical trials confirm that type 2 diabetes is preventable

Until recently, randomized clinical trials offered only limited proof that Type 2 diabetes is preventable by changes in lifestyle. Fortunately, this gap has now been filled. Several major lifestyle intervention trials have been successfully completed. The results are consistent: the risk of Type 2 diabetes can be halved in people who are at high risk; the effect of lifestyle change is rapid; the lifestyle changes required to achieve a significant risk reduction do not have to be drastic; and benefits are similar in different ethnic groups.

Drug development and diabetes: can we ensure an open environment for their data?

The development of new drugs might contribute to the defeat of some diseases, including diabetes, for which no cure has yet been found. New drugs are necessary and very welcome, provided that they are launched on the market following thorough, reliable and independent clinical evaluation of their safety and effectiveness. This article digs into this issue, providing an example of the repercussions that market pressures and inadequate clinical reporting have had in the lives of people with diabetes.

Pages