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Lighting up diabetes in the Asian young: the ASDIAB study

Diabetes is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. The number of people with diabetes is currently estimated to amount to nearly 180 million in the over 140 IDF member countries. While a relatively large number of studies have so far been carried out into the causes and development of diabetes mellitus in the Caucasian populations, up until recently, data on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition in the Asian population was still relatively scarce. The Asian Young Diabetes (ASDIAB) Study, the most significant results of which are revealed below, was intended to fill this gap.

The changing face of diabetes: medical nutrition therapy

Previously disregarded due to the lack of strong clinical evidence supporting its effectiveness in the treatment of diabetes, the role of medical nutrition therapy has recently changed. This is all the more important given the link between diabetes and obesity, and the steady increase of the latter at a global level, particularly in the industrializing countries. So today, when advising on how to best manage the condition, diabetes healthcare teams are putting more and more emphasis on healthy lifestyles, of which nutrition is a major component.

Cognitive behaviour therapy: how to improve diabetes self-management

'It doesn't matter how hard I try, I'll still get the complications' is a typical example of how some people with diabetes feel when faced with the hardships of self-management and with the difficulty in controlling the condition despite all good intentions. It is, however, possible to escape from these negative feelings and gain renewed confidence in one's ability to manage diabetes, and in the positive impact of treatment on one's well-being, thanks to CBT – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

First regional EMME camp for children with diabetes

Summer camps provide an opportunity for children with diabetes to learn more about their condition in a safe and caring environment. Under the supervision of a dedicated staff, an enjoyable, well-structured educational programme of activities makes for a truly worthwhile event. This article reports on the experience of the first Eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (EMME) regional camp.

Obesity, diabetes, and the child

This article by Martin Silink explains why children are becoming obese. He describes the scope of the obesity epidemic and explains how this is thought to be linked to diabetes. He investigates the causes of unhealthy eating habits and the decline in physical activity, and shows how these are impacting on the health of the world's children.

Nuts! their health benefits

Although rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are declining in many developed countries, it remains the number one cause of death. In developing countries, CVD rates are increasing. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop CVD than people without diabetes. The prevention and treatment of CVD by diet is an important issue both for persons with diabetes and those without. Dr Alexandra Chisholm explains the benefits of eating nuts as part of a healthy balanced diet.

The English National Service Framework: worth waiting for?

Diabetes UK worked hard to influence the content of the National Service Framework (NSF) from the moment it was first announced by the then UK Health Secretary Frank Dobson in 1999. Indeed, we perceived the announcement of the NSF as a victory in itself – recognition at last that diabetes is a serious condition with major implications for the 1.4 million already diagnosed as well as those yet to be diagnosed. The long wait inevitably resulted in high expectations. However, many were not surprised when the government did not meet these expectations in their entirety.

The English National Service Framework: a primary care perspective

Martin Kent is a general practitioner with a special interest in the management and care of people with diabetes, and a clinical advisor in diabetes to the local Primary Care Trust (PCT). Matt Rangué is the Associate Director of Nursing & Clinical Governance to the Trust, with responsibility for workforce development, training and quality in the delivery of the new UK Diabetes National Service Framework (NSF). Martin and Matt see the UK Diabetes NSF as a valuable tool around which to plan and deliver services to people with diabetes.

Identifying the risk factors: diabetes in Asian Indians

As prevalence of diabetes increases globally, developing countries such as India face the massive burden of a diabetes epidemic in the urban population. Migrant Asians from the Indian subcontinent are known to have a higher prevalence of Type 2 diabetes than the host populations and other migrant ethnic groups. Studies conducted in several Asian countries in the last decade highlighted a rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the urban population. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is also on the rise, indicating a possible further increase in diabetes in the future.

Diabetes in Pakistan

Pakistan is a South-Asian country with a population of approximately 150 million. Diabetes prevalence in Pakistan is high: 12% of people above 25 years of age suffer from the condition and 10% have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). When one considers the associated risk factors present in Pakistani society, the large number of people with diabetes is no surprise. Obesity tops the list.

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