Health Delivery

English

Diabetes and visual impairment - identifying needs, ensuring full accessibility

Many people with diabetes live with some form of visual impairment due to a variety of possible causes. Visual impairment due to diabetic retinopathy is a long-term complication of the condition. Diabetes also raises the risk for visual impairment due to cataracts, glaucoma and stroke. Age-related macular degeneration is not caused by diabetes, but like type 2diabetes, it occurs more frequently as people age, and many people have both.

Inpatient care for people with diabetes - bringing good practice into hospital

People with diabetes occupy a significant proportion of hospital beds – about 10% in the UK, although this may be an underestimate. While diabetes specialists are often based in a hospital, the majority of people with diabetes who are admitted to hospital – at a time when their diabetes might be difficult to control – do not actually meet the diabetes team.

Disease management programmes for diabetes in Germany

The number of people with diabetes is on the rise worldwide, posing previously unknown challenges for healthcare systems. In Germany, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is estimated to be nearly 7% – almost 6 million people. Additionally, it is estimated that  around another 3 million people living with diabetes are undiagnosed – around half the population with diabetes aged between 55 and 74 years according to one German study.

The extraordinary challenges faced by young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Diabetes in young people is a heavy burden all over the world but it is particularly severe in developing countries. Although the condition is the same, the context can be very different. Young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo have to face a number of major challenges. They are perceived as having a ‘mysterious disease’ which requires a lot of attention on a daily basis throughout a lifetime. Belief in spells is quite common in Africa, and many families feel it is their responsibility to find the person responsible for causing the diabetes.

The Border Health Strategic Initiative: addressing health disparities in border communities

Approximately 13 million people reside in the 80 Mexican municipalities and 48 US counties located along the US-Mexico border; 86% of those people live in 14 pairs of sister cities – metropolitan areas divided by the frontier. Border residents share similar resources and environmental problems. Issues of great concern include air quality, the availability and quality of water, and animal control. The communities along the border are economically and socially interdependent, with more than a million legal north- and southbound crossings every day.

Improvements in care for people with diabetes in Mozambique

An article in this magazine in March 2004 described the Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access in Mozambique, and some of the results from its implementation. Since it was carried out in 2003, much has changed in Mozambique with regards to access to insulin and diabetes care. The Protocol provided vital information on the areas that the healthcare system needed to focus upon in order to improve care.

Improving care and prevention for people with diabetes in Algeria

Like many other developing countries, Algeria is undergoing a transition in its disease  profile. The emergence of non-communicable diseases, including obesity-driven type 2

"Hello, diabetes." Preventing DKA in children with a telephone hotline service

If a child with diabetes develops ketoacidosis, it is absolutely critical that his or her parents are able to contact a trained healthcare provider immediately, 24 hours a day. Many parents report particular difficulties finding an experienced paediatrician to manage this emergency at night, and during week-ends and holidays. It has been demonstrated that these difficult situations can be overcome effectively using widely available telephone technology.

The North Karelia Project: 30 years successfully preventing chronic diseases

After World War II, chronic diseases, cardiovascular diseases in particular, became a major public health problem in industrialized countries. These diseases were perceived as diseases of affluence. Finland was hit hard: in the 1960s, Finland had the world’s highest rate of deaths from coronary heart disease. Middle-aged men were dying in great numbers. The rates were even higher in the east of the country – the highest figures being in the Province of North Karelia.

The CARMEN initiative - Latin America's response to the chronic disease burden

In most countries in the Americas, chronic diseases are now the leading cause of premature death and disability. Responsible for two of every three deaths among the general population, chronic diseases caused almost half of the mortality in people under 70 years old in 2002. The significant socio-economic inequities in Latin America compound the burden of chronic disease (including early death) among poorer people, locking many into a cycle of deprivation and ill-health.

Pages