Diabetes in Society

English

Identifying recent advances and remaining challenges in paediatric diabetes care in Japan

In Japan, the growing number of children and adolescents with overweight or obesity is driving an increase in youth-onset type 2 diabetes; the figures for type 1 diabetes remain constant among young people. In response, a number of initiatives have been developed and implemented in order to address diabetes-related issues and promote healthy living for young people affected by the condition.

Addressing the daily problems of children and adolescents in South Africa

In South Africa, managing diabetes in children and adolescents can be especially challenging. South Africa is a country of great socio-economic and ethnic diversity, where healthcare, like culture, languages and customs, varies significantly from one area to another. Furthermore, access to healthcare depends on affordability and availability, ranging in quality between developed- and developing-world standards. With these challenges in mind, the DAWN Youth South Africa survey was undertaken to evaluate the effects of diabetes on young people with the condition and their  family.

Advocacy, training and tools to improve psychosocial support for children with diabetes

Since its launch in 2006, DAWN Youth has worked to complement a number of existing programmes in the USA which contribute to the well-being of young people with diabetes. The US WebTalk survey recorded first-hand testimonies from young people with diabetes, their parents and healthcare professionals on what it means to live with diabetes. As in all  participating countries, schools were identified as a key area for improvement in the USA. This article outlines two of the initiatives of DAWN Youth USA, which may be a source of  ideas for action and improvement in other countries.

Promoting opportunities, fighting against isolation in India

India is undergoing an economic transformation – a financial boom according to many. Among India’s strong points contributing to this positive economic climate is its enormous young population. The potential for productivity, savings and investments by this generation will increase in the future, and is driving up levels of investments and confidence in the Indian economy. However, such gains are cancelled out to a large degree by excessive healthcare spending.

Know the warning signs of diabetes in children - World Diabetes Day 2008

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. It is a multiple-stakeholder partnership that includes diabetes organizations and their members around the world and Official World Diabetes Day Partners. Each campaign is centred on a theme that is established by the IDF Executive Board and approved by the World Health Organization. This year sees the second half of a 24-month campaign focussing on diabetes in children and adolescents. The main campaign slogan is ‘Know the warning signs’.

South African children at risk for future diseases: the way forward

South Africa is a land of paradoxes. South Africans deservedly celebrated an exceptional Rugby World Cup victory in 2007, but we most definitely are not yet winning the battle against inactivity and overweight among the nation’s young people – which is placing them at substantial risk for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. South Africa has the added challenge of dealing with a double burden of disease: the chronic non-communicable diseases mentioned above and communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.

IDF hosting innovative diabetes projects in 11 communities around the world

The BRIDGES grant programme is dedicated to supporting translational research in diabetes worldwide. The structure of BRIDGES is in place and the programme has taken the first steps towards accomplishing its overarching objective: to bridge the gap between science and people with diabetes – between clinical research and clinical practice – by supporting cost-effective and sustainable interventions to prevent and control diabetes.


The global chronic disease burden: what is being done?

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in 2005, HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria combined were responsible for around 4 million deaths. In the same year, chronic non-communicable diseases killed nearly 30 million people. Shocking as they are, these figures do not tell the full story of the disability, suffering and personal hardship that results from diabetes complications; or, on a larger economic scale, the enormous healthcare costs and lost productivity attributable to diabetes.

Developing a global framework to address non-communicable diseases

Heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer are now among the leading causes of death and disability around the world. The causes of these diseases include modifiable lifestyle-related risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet, lack of physical activity, as well as non-modifiable risk factors, including age and genetics. Due to population growth and the relative success of efforts to reduce communicable diseases, the number of people with non-communicable diseases will continue to rise in the future.

The economics of chronic disease: the case for government intervention

Much is heard of late about the high costs of chronic diseases like diabetes: chronic diseases are going to ‘break the bank’, impose tremendous costs on already struggling healthcare systems, and, very possibly, hinder growth in developing countries. Often, however, the suffering of people with chronic diseases seems to be lost in all the talk of money.

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