Diabetes in Society

English

Young people's needs and priorities for improved support and education: a call for action

Most young people’s lives are hectic. They all involve a degree of chaos, and the usual trials and tribulations of friendships, romance, college, and so on. Add the diabetes into the mix, with its unique challenges, and the situation can feel overwhelming. The authors of this report, young people who have been living with diabetes for some years, have all met several diabetes healthcare providers. Unfortunately, although many adults involved in diabetes care are keen to help young people to make the most of their life, this does not always appear to be the case.

Using new technologies in diabetes education

A complex and ever-growing network of satellites, antennas, cables and fibre optics enables human beings to establish dialogues with each other between one place and another just about anywhere on the planet. While new technologies have made a deep and irreversible impact on many aspects of daily life, in health services, these have, for the time being, only penetrated the niches of pilot projects.

Implementing a post-graduate degree course for diabetes educators in Argentina

One reason for poor diabetes outcomes – the development of disabling, potentially life-threatening complications – is the lack of effective participation by people with diabetes in the management of their own condition. This participation is the key to successfully achieving therapeutic goals. To be able to follow a difficult and complex life-long regimen requires high levels of motivation and knowledge. Yet although extensive evidence supports this concept, only a minority of people receive appropriate diabetes education.

Certification: a means for future recognition

Since the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (the organization responsible for certification of diabetes educators in the USA) was established in 1986, the importance and prevalence of professional certification have increased dramatically. New certification programmes are increasingly being developed for more and more occupations and professional specialties, while existing certification organizations are expanding their certification offerings.

The complex and constantly evolving role of diabetes educators

Diabetes educators are professional healthcare providers who are qualified to work with people in the management of their diabetes. The role of diabetes educators is dynamic and shaped by the environment in which they practise and by developments in research and technology. Core components are clinical care, education, counselling, research, and management.

TIDES: meeting diabetes needs in times of crisis

It is estimated that over 3 million deaths each year are directly related to diabetes. Of greatest concern is that diabetes prevalence appears to be highest in the low- and middle-income countries. Managing diabetes, a complex task in ideal circumstances, can be made extremely difficult in emergency situations. Millions of people around the world live under constant threat from armed conflict or natural disasters, such as floods, hurricanes and earthquakes. The difficulties faced by poor and underserved people in accessing diabetes care are exacerbated in times of catastrophe.

Taking up the struggle to improve care: a journey with diabetes

During a meeting halfway through a 24-month project for the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), surrounded by well-known health professionals, Barbara Elster was asked her opinion on one of the subjects under discussion. Having expressed her views, she contemplated how she, a person with no formal medical training, had come to be in such esteemed medical company, involved in producing national guidelines on diabetes for the UK Government.

Advocating for the rights of people with diabetes in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked, largely mountainous country, bordering Kazakhstan, China, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, and is therefore sometimes referred to as ‘the Switzerland of Central Asia’. But the dramatic beauty of its snow-capped mountains and Alpine gorges hides a terrible potential for destruction: heavy winter snow often leads to spring floods, provoking serious damage in valleys and lowlands.

The BRIDGES programme: sharing practical solutions and improving outcome

Diabetes is now the world’s fourth leading cause of death by illness, and the global epidemic shows no signs of abating. In recent decades, a revolution in science has contributed to a greater understanding of diabetes and the development of new cutting-edge therapies. However, diabetes prevalence, and diabetes-related death and disability have continued to grow rapidly.

Family-centred education for migrants with diabetes in Scotland

A culturally sensitive, intensive diabetes education service is being delivered in the community to people of ethnic-minority origin living with type 2 diabetes in Lothian, Scotland. Designed by a pharmacist, the initiative began as a research project, but the effectiveness and popularity of the programme resulted in its development and implementation as part of the local diabetes care package.

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