Diabetes in Society

English

Family-centred education for migrants with diabetes in Scotland

A culturally sensitive, intensive diabetes education service is being delivered in the community to people of ethnic-minority origin living with type 2 diabetes in Lothian, Scotland. Designed by a pharmacist, the initiative began as a research project, but the effectiveness and popularity of the programme resulted in its development and implementation as part of the local diabetes care package.

Redesigning the urban environment to promote physical activity in Southern India

Type 2 diabetes has become the most common metabolic disorder. Its prevalence is growing most rapidly among people in the developing world, primarily due to the rapid demographic and epidemiological changes in these regions. According to IDF, India currently leads the world with an estimated 41 million people with diabetes; this figure is predicted to increase to 66 million by 2025. The diabetes epidemic is more pronounced in urban areas in India, where rates of diabetes are roughly double those in rural areas.

Reaching for dreams: enjoying sucessful diabetes management through sports

Despite the wealth of evidence to support the health benefits of physical activity in people with diabetes, many people, when diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, decide to refrain from taking part in sports, and some are even advised to do so by their healthcare provider. When Olympic volleyball player, Bas van de Goor, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his lack of diabetes knowledge led him to believe he should retire from organized sport.

Motivating, learning and socializing: summer camps for elderly people with diabetes

A conversation with a 70-year-old woman with diabetes gave an endocrinologist working in Belgrade, Serbia, an interesting idea. The patient expressed her desire to go on holiday but was clearly worried about managing her diabetes away from home – without access to familiar healthcare resources. Teodora Beljic recognized the need for some form of holiday facility for older people with diabetes, and decided to explore the feasibility of recreational and educational programmes.

Educating, supporting, understanding: a challenging role for parents of children with diabetes

Diabetes is a family affair. When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, a wide range of challenges affects parents and siblings. While the role of parents in day-to-day living with diabetes is subject to constant change according to the age of their child, it is always crucial. Families constantly experience their loved-one’s diabetes, in an emotional as well as a practical sense. Eveline van Gulik explores some of the challenges faced by parents of children with diabetes, and describes, from her own experience, the enormous impact on family life.

The IDF Task Force on Insulin, Test Strips and Other Diabetes Supplies: promoting access to care for everyone with diabetes


The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


Eli Lilly - our vision: support for all people with diabetes


Novo Nordisk: changing diabetes care in the developing world


Keeping insulin cool naturally - the DREAM Trust storage system

DREAM Trust is a non-government organization and registered charity in Nagpur, central India. In this region and indeed throughout the Indian sub-continent and the developing world, covering the medication needs of a child with diabetes requires many families to commit a quarter of their monthly income. The principal objective of DREAM Trust is to respond to these needs by providing insulin, accessories and healthcare free of charge to poor children with type 1 diabetes.

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