Diabetes in Society

English

Focus on the front line: l'Association Malienne de Lutte contre le Diabète

Contrary to the now outdated idea of diabetes as a disease of rich people in rich countries, the condition is increasingly widespread in Africa. Mali, the second-largest country in West Africa, bordering the Sahara desert to the north and Côte d’Ivoire and Senegal to the south, has not escaped the budding epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Overall prevalence is thought to exceed 2% – nearly a quarter of a million people. Most of these have type 2 diabetes and live in the urban areas.

Focus on the front line: Diabetes South Africa

Diabetes is emerging as a serious public-health problem in South Africa, particularly in the urban areas, where social welfare and health systems are precarious, and there is a lack of access to appropriate health information. Diabetes South Africa (DSA), established in 1969, advocates for the rights of all people with diabetes in the country.

Promoting global action on the social determinants of health

Throughout the world, socially disadvantaged people with inadequate access to health resources suffer worse health status and die younger than people in more privileged social positions. Yet although the greatest share of health problems is attributable to living conditions, health policies are dominated by disease-focused solutions that largely ignore the social environment. As a result, inequalities have widened and health interventions have obtained less than optimal results.

Information bias: why it happens and how to avoid it

As patients, many of us assume that we are receiving the best possible treatment for any medical condition we may have – people with diabetes are no exception. However, with an increasing emphasis on empowerment and choice, many of us are no longer prepared to simply assume that the treatment we are offered is the best available. For others, doubts arise when a treatment seems ineffective or there are adverse effects. Is the prescribed treatment the most suitable? Are there alternative treatments that might be more successful? Both patients and physicians

The year of the disadvantaged and the vulnerable

The International Diabetes Federation is engaged in a global strategic plan to raise awareness of diabetes. One of the principal tools to help unite awareness-raising efforts worldwide is IDF’s World Diabetes Day campaign. Spread over 12 months, the campaign climaxes in the World Diabetes Day celebrations that take place on or around 14 November. World Diabetes Day offers a unique opportunity for the global diabetes community to celebrate the lives of people with diabetes and raise awareness of the condition among the general public and healthcare decision makers.

Overlooked and in jeopardy: indigenous people with diabetes

There are more than 375 million indigenous people in the world. The guardians of a rich knowledge of the natural world, intricate cultivation systems, animal husbandry, and the use of traditional medicines, they represent a treasure of cultural diversity, including more than half the world’s 5000 to 6000 languages. Indigenous people practice innumerable ways of living together with respect for fellow human beings and the environment. But it is estimated that within the next two decades, as indigenous communities continue to be decimated – in many cases driven

Migration and diabetes: the emerging challenge

Diabetes is affecting more and more people every year. In the last decade, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes of one kind or another increased by almost 50%. By the year 2025, more than 300 million people around the world could have been diagnosed with the condition. Many others who have diabetes will not have been diagnosed. Diabetes also represents a major threat to the health of the world’s millions of migrants, who appear to be at greater risk of developing diabetes than non-migrants. Manuel Carballo and Frederik Siem report.

Unite for Diabetes: the campaign for a UN Resolution

In 2003, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes had an idea which looks set to change the face of diabetes. Not long after his election as President-Elect of the International Diabetes Federation, Martin Silink was approached by Clare Rosenfeld, who spoke of her dream of a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. Inspired by Clare’s dream, Martin Silink spent the subsequent two years gauging the opinion of the diabetes stakeholders and garnering worldwide support for a UN Resolution. He

The metabolic syndrome: an Asian perspective

In the global epidemic of diabetes and obesity, Asia is being hit the hardest. Each year, 17 million people die from stroke and heart disease worldwide. Of these deaths, 11 million will occur in developing regions, including Asia. Approximately

The metabolic syndrome in developing countries

The occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in various ethnic groups – including Caucasians, Africans, Latin Americans, Asian Indians, Chinese, Aboriginal Australians, Polynesians and Micronesians – has been confirmed in

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