Diabetes in Society

English

Appropriate footwear: sandals or shoes?

From the moment they are diagnosed with the condition, people with diabetes receive all kinds of advice – or at least they should – ideally from others with the condition or family members who are ‘experts’ in living with diabetes, and professional health-care providers. Of all of these recommendations, one that is often misinterpreted is that relating to ‘appropriate footwear’. The key to this lies in the word ‘appropriate’.

Fighting discrimination with fire in South Africa

Despite his 13 years of experience as a voluntary fire fighter, Stuart Murdoch’s application to become a professional member of the fire brigade in his home town of Fish Hoek, South Africa was rejected – because he had type 1 diabetes. Upon hearing of his employers’ decision to discriminate against him on the grounds of his condition, Stuart felt indignant and deflated; but he was not defeated. This is his account of how his successful struggle against ignorance and discrimination changed the law for people with diabetes in South Africa.

Political support groups can advance our cause

One day in 1997, when he and his family should have been celebrating his wife’s birthday, Guy Barnett’s life changed abruptly: having been diagnosed with type 1

The price of 'progress'? Diabetes in Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians have poorer health than the rest of the Australian population; for Aboriginal people, life expectancy is about 20 years less than for the general population. Significantly though, the low expectation of life in Indigenous Australians is less associated with high child mortality, as occurs in many groups in developing countries; the big differences are among young to middle-aged adults.

Religion, politics and the diabetic foot in Senegal

Sixty seven-year-old Venerable Karamogo is the spiritual and community leader of a village in the South of Senegal. About nine years after Karamogo was diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic infection developed in his left leg. The surgeons recommended amputation; but this advice was firmly rejected by Karamogo and his family.

The psycho-social impact of diabetes foot damage

Over half of all lower-extremity amputations are related to diabetes. Indeed, foot ulceration is an increasing problem worldwide and there is little evidence of a reduction in the numbers of foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes.

Counting the costs of the diabetic foot

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires a life-long commitment of resources to the prevention and treatment of complications. The condition affects an increasing number of people all around the world, putting them at risk for foot ulcers and amputations. In addition to causing acute suffering, foot lesions in people with diabetes have substantial economic consequences: up to 20% of total expenditure on diabetes might be attributable to the diabetic foot. Jan Apelqvist and Gunnel Ragnarson Tennvall report on the economic impact of diabetes foot damage

Cost-effective tobacco control measures

Tobacco consumption is the second leading risk factor for death worldwide. It is estimated that currently 4.9 million people die each year due to tobacco-related diseases and, if current trends in tobacco consumption continue, this death toll will double in 20 years. As research continues into the effects of tobacco on health, the list of conditions that are caused or compounded by tobacco has expanded. There is nowadays evidence that almost every organ in the body is affected by tobacco smoking. Effective control of tobacco consumption has been seen in

Diabetes Action Now: putting diabetes on the international agenda

Diabetes Action Now, a joint initiative of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), aims to stimulate action to address the growing burden of diabetes, especially in low- and middle-income countries and communities. The programme, based at the World Health Organization offices in Geneva, Switzerland, is supported by WHO funds and a grant from the World Diabetes Foundation. As reported previously in Diabetes Voice, Diabetes Action

Project HOPE Mexico: empowering people to care for themselves and others

If current trends continue, within the next 10 years, a quarter of all people in Mexico will be living with diabetes. Diabetes already affects 12% of the general population and, astonishingly, one in three people over 65 years of age. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputations. Indeed, in 2004, diabetes was declared the leading cause of death in Mexico due to its link

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