Diabetes in Society

English

Empowerment and how it can be implemented: the role of diabetes associations

The definitions of empowerment are many but less varied. They all tend to refer to a ‘process’. In this article, Mr Bjørnar Allgot, Norway, briefly analyses the concept of empowerment and gives guidelines as to how this process can be achieved. Finally, as IDF Vice President, Mr Allgot sees the need for the International Diabetes Federation to create an effective tool for evaluating empowerment which can be used by member associations around the world.

Children reaching children: the Diabetic Counsellors in Training

The success of the Diabetic Counsellors in Training (CiTs) programme has not only been recognized locally but also internationally. The counsellors presented their programme at last year’s Pan Africa Congress held in Johannesburg and again at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City. At both congresses, their presentation received standing ovation. What is this revolutionary and dynamic movement out of Johannesburg, South Africa?

How to develop a diabetes association: a case study on the Icelandic Diabetes Association

In Issue 3 1999 of Diabetes Voice, Dr Ástrádur Hreidarsson of the Endocrinology and Diabetic Clinics at the National University Hospital in Iceland’s capital, Reykjavik, wrote about how diabetes care is managed in this sparsely populated country. In the past two years, many further developments have taken place as a result of a close cooperation between the Icelandic Diabetes Association and the other Nordic countries.

Turning policy into action

Mr Luc Hendrickx is the new executive director of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). He holds degrees in linguistics and business management, and worked for 10 years in a similar organization in oncology before joining IDF on September 1. Luc was one of the founders and first president of the Associations Conference Forum, an international organization for communications and networking among association executives in conference management.

Delivering the message through effective advocacy

Diabetes is spreading across the world at an epidemic rate. Since making a decision to increase its attention to advocacy in 1994, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has led numerous successful advocacy efforts. Providing information to policy makers is crucial. Nevertheless, even with the economic facts in hand, it remains important to use them in such a way that will bring about governmental action to support research and programmes aimed at conquering diabetes.

Getting governements to listen to economic facts

Over £5.2 billion a year – 9 percent of the entire National Health Service budget – is spent on diabetes and its complications in the UK. There is no doubt that diabetes is a significant health economic issue here, as it is elsewhere in the world. Although diabetes is not consistently high on the government’s priority list, Diabetes UK has been successful in forming a strong lobby, which is increasing in political weight.

Diabetes efforts with limited resources in Tanzania

The Tanzania Diabetes Association, established in 1985, is playing a crucial role in providing people in this extremely impoverished country with essential diabetes care. What, at the outset, may have seemed nearly impossible through a lack of funds, has, nevertheless, come into being through a well organized strategy and clear objectives.

IDF Europe: unity through diversity

On a sunny weekend in October this year, some 90 representatives of diabetes associations from Scandinavia, the Mediterranean, the European Union, central Europe and former Soviet-block countries gathered in Utrecht, The Netherlands, for the annual European ‘Together We Are Stronger’ meeting. This forum for exchange gave the delegates the unique opportunity to meet in person and share experiences and best practices with fellow diabetes advocates.

Regional highlights 2001: Regional Development Plan shows results

Five years after the introduction of the Regional Development Plan (RDP), which called for basic infrastructure to be put into place, the IDF’s seven Regions are showing the results of this investment. Regional strategic action plans now provide the framework for initiatives to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Developing educational courses strengthening strategic partnerships and improving communications were among the highlights of a very active and productive year

Diabetes to priority for Iranian National Advisory Committee

The first systematic epidemiological studies in Iran were begun in 1993. However, in light of the growing number of people with diabetes and the accruing costs, estimated to exceed US$400 million a year, a need was recognized in 1998 to study the more recent epidemiology of diabetes in Iran. In 1998 the National Committee for Diabetes was formed, and a project undertaken in 1999 involving nearly 2.5 million people. Many other substantial moves have been made in Iran to help deal with diabetes in the country.

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