Diabetes in Society

English

The road to becoming a working mum

Shilpa Verma from India is a mother, a wife, a diabetologist and a clinical researcher. But long before she became all these, she was diagnosed with diabetes.

The impact of diabetes on family life

Children need a healthy mother, not one with incapacitating complications, an unstable character due to the highs and lows of blood glucose levels, or who might endanger them by losing control while having a severe hypoglycaemic reaction. Children need a full-time caregiver. A responsible woman educated to take command of her diabetes can fulfil this role just as well as a woman without diabetes; sometimes even better.

Islam, women and diabetes

Islam instructs believers to take care of their health. Prophet Muhammad said, "There are two graces which many people misevaluate; (they are) health and free time (for doing good)". This is why taking care of the body is the foremost duty of the woman as she takes care of all the dietary and health concerns of herself and her family.

Rural women: the Bangladesh perspective

Diabetes poses a serious threat to developing countries like Bangladesh. Despite advances in diabetes treatment, management and self-care, women with diabetes in rural Bangladesh are rarely able to enjoy the fruits of this progress.

In the mood: sex and the woman with diabetes

We, women with diabetes have known it for as long as we have been women with diabetes: our problems associated with sexual function are a result of our moods, our sense of self, our body image, our psychological state, as well as our degree of control over our lives and our diabetes. At last the scientific literature has caught up with us.

Girl power

Any girl will be able to tell you that life as a teenager comes with its own challenges. Mix these challenges with diabetes and you have a cocktail of perplexing bewilderment and confusion at times! These three testimonies from South Africa show that diabetes in the teenage years can be scary, but ultimately can make you a stronger person.

Diabetes, fear, and self-loathing: one person's story

When he left home to attend his regular diabetes clinic, Ray Msengana was already feeling unwell. But when he was told that the treatment of his Type 2 diabetes was to change from tablets to insulin therapy, he rapidly felt a lot worse. In this candid account of life with diabetes, Ray Msengana describes the affective impact of the condition, and makes a call for changes in the way diabetes is managed.

A world-wide call to action

The scale of the problem that diabetes poses to world health is still widely under-recognized. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that if current trends continue, the number of people with diabetes will almost double; from 194 million people in 2003 to 333 million by the year 2025. Diabetes is already the most costly health-care problem in the westernized and 'westernizing' countries.

Listen to a voice

Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her carers are seriously concerned about how she is going to manager her diabetes.

Self-care: an important and cost-effective investment

The elevated cost of diabetes can be seen as the result of all previous failures of treatment. As illustrated in this article, treating diabetes complications is far more expensive than taking preventative measures. Future cost cutting, therefore, can only be achieved by improving the level of care, especially in the field of self-management. People with diabetes must be given the means to do this, which can only be attained by future investment.

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