Diabetes in Society

English

Listen to a voice

Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her carers are seriously concerned about how she is going to manager her diabetes.

Self-care: an important and cost-effective investment

The elevated cost of diabetes can be seen as the result of all previous failures of treatment. As illustrated in this article, treating diabetes complications is far more expensive than taking preventative measures. Future cost cutting, therefore, can only be achieved by improving the level of care, especially in the field of self-management. People with diabetes must be given the means to do this, which can only be attained by future investment.

Becoming experts

Increasing the knowledge of people with diabetes gives them motivation and promotes better diabetes control. This, in turn, enhances quality of life and delays, if not totally prevents, the onset of complications. The Danish Diabetes Education Centre, opened in Odense, 1993, does just that, by providing teaching and assistance to people with diabetes and their friends and families. The centre educates over 500 people in total each year.

A dream becomes reality

Palma, Mallorca, 3-8 July, 2001. The VIII European Masters Championships in Swimming, Diving and Open Water Swimming took place. James Foley of the Diabetes Federation of Ireland’s and John Keeler, former Editor of Identity, the Federation’s magazine, were there to take part! James, from Dublin, is 39 years old and has had diabetes for 19 years. I, also of Dublin, am 30 and have had diabetes for 26 years.

Slovenian St Vincent Declaration Board urges increased government action

Although diabetes is not included in the national ‘Health for All’ legislation, a new government, elected a year ago, brings with it the promise of a better future for people with diabetes in Slovenia. The new Minister of Health has displayed an interest in prevention policies concerning chronic diseases, as well as in promoting healthy lifestyle. The Slovenian Diabetes Association (SLODA) has taken some initial steps towards a closer co-operation with the new government.

Women with diabetes: facing double discrimination?

Being a woman and having diabetes can mean double discrimination for women all over the world. Even more so in many developing countries, where women, whether they have diabetes or not, still have to fight harder than ever to achieve equal rights and equal opportunities. This article, however, will not offer a helpless victim's point of view.

Defining the role of social workers in diabetes care

Talk to anyone with diabetes or their family members about living with such a complex condition and they will tell you about the many physical and psychological issues they continually face. This article highlights some of the principal psychosocial concerns affecting diabetes care and explains how social workers can help people to cope with the challenges and changes which are triggered by diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes and stress

While stress has long been considered an important factor in Type 2 diabetes, there has been very little experimental evidence to show how it might affect the development of the disease. This article looks at recent research evidence which demonstrates the relationship between stress and the onset and course of Type 2 diabetes and describes how simple stress management techniques can have a significant impact on long-term diabetes control.

A threat to ethnic communities: diabetes and heart disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the USA has labelled diabetes 'the epidemic of our time'. Indeed, diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in the USA, with 75% of diabetes-related deaths attributable to cardiovascular disease. According to the US Office of Minority Health, the prevalence of diabetes among African-Americans is about 70% higher than in Caucasians, and the prevalence in Hispanics is nearly double that of Caucasians. Currently it is estimated that 2.3 million African-Americans and 1.2 million Hispanics have Type 2 diabetes in the USA alone.

Diabetes: its indirect costs. The costs of lost production

When someone is sick, be it short-term or long-term, we immediately think of the costs this person has to bear in terms of both physical pain and of the money needed to buy drugs and other supplies to get better or keep the condition under control. We might also go as far as to consider the financial costs borne by national healthcare systems. But there is more to health economics that this. Delve into this article to find out why we cannot remain blind to the so-called indirect costs of diabetes.

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