Diabetes in Society

English

Diabetes: its indirect costs. The costs of lost production

When someone is sick, be it short-term or long-term, we immediately think of the costs this person has to bear in terms of both physical pain and of the money needed to buy drugs and other supplies to get better or keep the condition under control. We might also go as far as to consider the financial costs borne by national healthcare systems. But there is more to health economics that this. Delve into this article to find out why we cannot remain blind to the so-called indirect costs of diabetes.

Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

Poverty versus genes: the social context of Type 2 diabetes

Together with its 'twin sister', childhood obesity, Type 2 diabetes is spreading among young people around the world. This constitutes a serious public health problem; by their 30s, generations of young people will have been living with Type 2

Thinking big to raise awareness in India: the mega diabetes show

According to World Health Organization (WHO) figures, 23 million people in India have diabetes, more than in any other country in the world. By 2025, this number is expected to increase to over 57 million. In other words, one in seven people in India will have diabetes. The increasing prevalence of diabetes seen throughout Asia is a reflection of the effects of westernization, urbanization, and mechanization, all of which are associated with a sedentary life style. Diabetes requires life-long treatment and impacts upon people's daily lives. It carries the risk of chronic complications.

International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors: dreaming, learning, doing

'Dreaming, learning, doing' is the inspirational slogan of the International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors (IDYA). As the former National Youth Advocate for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Clare Rosenfeld received a multitude of e-mails from young people with diabetes around the world. Some asked for assistance; others for education. All of them shared a dream of one day seeing a cure for diabetes. This dream led Clare to contact Children with Diabetes (CWD), in the hope of creating a global programme to unite these young people.

Diabetes in pets

Diabetes is not unique to people. About 1 in every 500 dogs and about 1 in every 200 cats has diabetes, and as is the case with people, these numbers are increasing. Margarethe Hoenig looks at the symptoms and treatment of diabetes in cats and dogs.

Globesity: a crisis of growing proportions

In the United States, the latest data show that two out of three adults are overweight, and nearly one in three is obese. Alarmingly, similar trends are emerging around the world. In countries as diverse as the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Kuwait, and Mexico at least half the population is overweight and one in five is obese.

IDF and WHO initiatives to put diabetes on the health agenda in Africa

Although the exact magnitude of the problem in Africa is not well understood, diabetes is a serious threat to public health throughout the continent. In 2003, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) predicted that by 2010, diabetes prevalence in Africa would increase by around 95%. Ignoring diabetes could lead to the breakdown of the fragile health systems in Africa, which are already overwhelmed by communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Prevention of diabetes throughout an obesogenic world

Overweight is an important risk factor for noncommunicable diseases in general and diabetes in particular. There is presently a global epidemic of overweight. A recent large study found a 5.6% growth in obesity in the United States in 2001, and a massive 74% increase since 1991. Twenty one percent of American adults are obese. The prevalence of diabetes, which correlates with obesity has risen 61% in the US since 1990. Diabetes rose 8% over 2000-01 to nearly 8% of the population. The situation is not much better in many developing countries.

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