Diabetes in Society

English

Protecting the junk-food generation - the need for international intervention

An unhealthy diet is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, so what can we do to help people eat healthily? An important step is to ensure that children are encouraged to eat healthy food, and are not subjected to marketing that promotes energy-dense food that is high in fat, sugar and salt. Justin Macmullan looks at profit-driven but potentially dangerous marketing practices, and calls for an international code of practice to prevent the children of today from becoming the junk-food generation of tomorrow.


IDF and Rotary - reaching out to fight diabetes from the grassroots

IDF is an organization of associations in over 160 countries around the world. As such, it is organized from the ground up. Local associations deliver the programmes of the Federation. While offering counsel and advice as well as access to best practices, IDF seeks to empower the local association. Rotary International is a similar organization. The world’s largest and oldest service club, it has over 1.2 million members in more than 33,000 clubs in 160 countries.


DIAMAP - mapping the future of diabetes research

It may be a surprise to hear that at present there is no overall plan or framework to coordinate or fund research into diabetes across Europe – despite the urgent attention called to the disease from many organizations both patient-led and professional. Although investigators within different research fields and individual research groups have a good idea of where their research is heading, and although national diabetes associations may have drawn up research strategies in order to use national funds wisely, there is no Europe-wide strategy.


Lessons from the learners - turning hope into action

From time to time, family doctor and chief medical officer Alan Glaseroff interviews panels of people with diabetes in front of an audience of other people with diabetes, medical professionals, diabetes educators and clinical teams. The panel members are people who, having successfully overcome obstacles which at first caused them to struggle with their condition, are willing to share their stories.

Coping with diabetes and self-management: a teenage perspective

Diagnosed when he was 12 years old, Adam Elliot has had type 1 diabetes for nearly three years. He is currently a student at All Saints Catholic High School in Kanata, Ontario, Canada. In this article, he shares his experiences of type 1 diabetes and explains how self-management has made his life with the condition not just bearable but as he sees it ‘a real journey that I believe is providing me  with a lot of useful life lessons’.

Art beyond therapy: when patients and healthcare providers share the limelight

Healthcare implies sound knowledge in the field of biomedicine, underpinned by evidence-based medicine. There is another fundamental dimension: the healthcare provider-patient relationship. Balint studied the gap between the professional identity of doctors and the reality of patients – an ocean of unspoken messages separates their worlds. The further dimension is that of therapeutic education, the objective of which is to help people to become more autonomous. In these three aspects of healthcare, the relationship between patients and doctors is never even.

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

Understand diabetes and take control: World Diabetes Day 2009

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. Created by the Federation and the World Health Organization in 1991, World Diabetes Day is an official United Nations Day. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public spotlight. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted after the passage of the United Nations Resolution on diabetes.

The St Vincent Declaration 20 years on - defeating diabetes in the 21st century

One of the founders of the St Vincent movement, Michiel Krans, recently described the transformation in widely held perceptions of the role of people with diabetes during the years preceding the St Vincent Declaration in 1989.

Diabetes UK after 75 years - the way forward for a lasting association

Diabetes UK has come a long way. Since its humble beginnings in London in the early 20th century, when a handful of people with diabetes and medical professionals met in HG Wells’ London apartment, Diabetes UK has grown into a countrywide organization that is active in a range of fields, including advocacy for the rights of people with diabetes, scientific research, and public awareness-raising. In 2009, Diabetes UK, a key member association of the International Diabetes Federation, will celebrate its 75th anniversary at a national conference in Glasgow, UK.

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