Diabetes in Society

English

Lessons from the learners - turning hope into action

From time to time, family doctor and chief medical officer Alan Glaseroff interviews panels of people with diabetes in front of an audience of other people with diabetes, medical professionals, diabetes educators and clinical teams. The panel members are people who, having successfully overcome obstacles which at first caused them to struggle with their condition, are willing to share their stories.

Coping with diabetes and self-management: a teenage perspective

Diagnosed when he was 12 years old, Adam Elliot has had type 1 diabetes for nearly three years. He is currently a student at All Saints Catholic High School in Kanata, Ontario, Canada. In this article, he shares his experiences of type 1 diabetes and explains how self-management has made his life with the condition not just bearable but as he sees it ‘a real journey that I believe is providing me  with a lot of useful life lessons’.

Art beyond therapy: when patients and healthcare providers share the limelight

Healthcare implies sound knowledge in the field of biomedicine, underpinned by evidence-based medicine. There is another fundamental dimension: the healthcare provider-patient relationship. Balint studied the gap between the professional identity of doctors and the reality of patients – an ocean of unspoken messages separates their worlds. The further dimension is that of therapeutic education, the objective of which is to help people to become more autonomous. In these three aspects of healthcare, the relationship between patients and doctors is never even.

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

Understand diabetes and take control: World Diabetes Day 2009

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. Created by the Federation and the World Health Organization in 1991, World Diabetes Day is an official United Nations Day. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public spotlight. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted after the passage of the United Nations Resolution on diabetes.

The St Vincent Declaration 20 years on - defeating diabetes in the 21st century

One of the founders of the St Vincent movement, Michiel Krans, recently described the transformation in widely held perceptions of the role of people with diabetes during the years preceding the St Vincent Declaration in 1989.

Diabetes UK after 75 years - the way forward for a lasting association

Diabetes UK has come a long way. Since its humble beginnings in London in the early 20th century, when a handful of people with diabetes and medical professionals met in HG Wells’ London apartment, Diabetes UK has grown into a countrywide organization that is active in a range of fields, including advocacy for the rights of people with diabetes, scientific research, and public awareness-raising. In 2009, Diabetes UK, a key member association of the International Diabetes Federation, will celebrate its 75th anniversary at a national conference in Glasgow, UK.

Social injustice and unmet needs: women and diabetes in the Americas

Diabetes has become an important cause of death and disability in the Americas and worldwide. In the region comprising South America, Central America and the Caribbean, and North America, the number of people with diabetes is expected to rise from 13 million to 33 million by 2030. An even more marked increase is set to occur in Latin America and the Caribbean, where most of the nations are considered to be developing countries. This rising prevalence of diabetes is already having grave effects on societies, and women throughout the continent are baring the brunt of the pandemic.

Social stigma and discrimination: a care crisis for young women with diabetes in India

In most regions of the world, type 1 diabetes is more common in girls than in boys. Since the 1970s, a female excess has been reported in populations of African and Asian origins. Indeed, most countries have reported either no gender difference or increased incidence of type 1 diabetes in girls. Contrary to these worldwide findings, certain endocrine centres in northern India report a higher outpatient attendance of men and boys with type 1 diabetes.

The fattening rooms of Calabar - a breeding ground for diabesity

Calabar is the capital city of Cross River State of Nigeria. It is a cosmopolitan town with a population of about half a million people. The population of Cross River State stands at around 2.5 million. Inhabitants of the region are mostly farmers, fishermen and civil servants. The Efik in south Calabar are a proud people with a rich cultural heritage. In Efik communities, the preservation of centuries-old values and customs is central to the tradition of ‘fattening rooms’.

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