Diabetes in Society

English

Abject poverty, major difficulties and tragic outcomes in Cambodia

When her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes in 1997, it was shocking news to Sokhann. For more than a decade, she lived with her condition without any treatment, education or follow-up.

Bambi in danger - poverty and unmet needs in Mauritania

Bambi is a 19-year old Mauritanian woman. Illiterate and poor, she is married and has a four-year-old daughter. Early in 2008, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It took her 10 months of struggle to learn to read her blood glucose monitoring device and inject insulin.

Xiaoping's story: multiple psychosocial barriers to a full and happy life

Xiaoping, a 15-year-old girl living in a rural region of china, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in october 2007. since then, her life has undergone a series of dramatic changes.

Diabetes in Nauru: the price of economic wealth and westernization

While we may believe we understand the connection, Nauruans know first-hand, and perhaps better than anyone else, the bitter link between negative lifestyle change and one of its devastating consequences – type 2 diabetes. Located in the Central Pacific, 60 km south of the equator, Nauru is the smallest independent republic in the world. Its 10,000 inhabitants occupy a single coral island only 6 km long and 4 km wide. Approximately 80% of the population are indigenous Nauruans of Micronesian origin.

'Stomp the Fat' - an effective national weight-reduction campaign

Despite a fall in diabetes prevalence from around 35% in 1975 to 16% in 2004, obesity and non-communicable diseases, including type 2 diabetes, remain the primary threat to health and well-being confronting Nauru in the 21st century. Nauru has few natural resources and, with a population of only 10,000, does not have the critical mass to support manufacturing. Nor, with a tiny land mass of 21 km² and unfavourable topography and soil conditions, can it support farming.

Delivering hope, promise and support to Canadians living with diabetes

A staggering number of Canadians, 8.4 million, are currently living with diabetes or are at increased risk  of developing the condition during their lifetime. With 2.4 million affected by diabetes and 6 million in a state of ‘pre-diabetes’ – many of whom are unaware that they have impaired glucose tolerance – diabetes is an invisible, potentially deadly pandemic that affects a quarter of the Canadian population.

Education, advocacy, and support for research in Quebec

In this report, Serge Langlois provides information on the mission and objectives of Diabète Québec. Founded in 1954, Diabète Québec currently unites some 30,000 people with diabetes, healthcare professionals and around 50 affiliated associations that serve communities throughout Quebec – comprising a quarter of Canada’s population. The three pillars of Diabète Québec’s mission are to inform, raise awareness and prevent diabetes and its complications.


Innovation, inspiration and an integrated approach - the World Diabetes Congress, Montreal, 2009

The International Diabetes Federation’s 20th World Diabetes Congress will be hosted in Montreal, Canada, from 18 to 22 October 2009 and will provide the ideal platform for all diabetes stakeholders to meet in person. The global diabetes community will gather in Montreal to exchange the latest diabetes science and ideas and enjoy networking opportunities. In this electronic and ‘virtual’ age, the need to meet face to face seems increasingly important – and this will be the perfect occasion to do so.

The IMAGE project - preventing type 2 diabetes in Europe

The standards for diabetes prevention vary greatly between the EU Member States. By sharing best practices and raising standards in the prevention of type 2 diabetes throughout the EU, the development of the condition in those at risk can be reduced. Major studies have demonstrated that prevention programmes can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Based on convincing evidence from clinical studies, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have published recommendations for the prevention of the condition.

Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

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