Diabetes in Society

English

The IMAGE project - preventing type 2 diabetes in Europe

The standards for diabetes prevention vary greatly between the EU Member States. By sharing best practices and raising standards in the prevention of type 2 diabetes throughout the EU, the development of the condition in those at risk can be reduced. Major studies have demonstrated that prevention programmes can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Based on convincing evidence from clinical studies, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have published recommendations for the prevention of the condition.

Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

The DAWN Youth initiative - setting priorities for action

DAWN Youth is a worldwide initiative dedicated to improving the level and conditions of psychosocial support for children, adolescents and young adults with diabetes and their families worldwide. For young people affected by the condition, having to learn to accept diabetes as a part of daily living is a far greater trauma than is realized by many – even health professionals. For their families, it is a complex burden: daily diabetes management is largely in the hands of the family and the young person.

How is diabetes perceived? The results of the DAWN Youth survey

In 2001, the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) study interviewed more than 5400 adults with diabetes and more than 3800 diabetes care professionals in 13 countries. The main purpose of  that research was to identify new ways to overcome the psychosocial barriers to the optimal health and quality of life of people with diabetes and those at risk.

The DAWN verdict on diabetes support in schools: could do better

Because their condition affects every aspect of their daily  life, children and adolescents with diabetes are faced with more problems than are many of their peers without diabetes. The greater part of their day is spent at school, and this is where many of the greatest problems lie. Dealing with diabetes in school is one of the most important topics in the daily life of many families. The 2007 online WebTalk survey, conducted in eight countries as part of the DAWN Youth survey, has contributed to an increased understanding of the issues faced by children and adolescents with diabetes.

DAWN Youth in Europe - international principles, national actions

While diabetes healthcare professionals quite rightly offer a combination of treatment, information and instructions, the time has come for another dimension to be added to diabetes care practices: attention to psychological and social challenges facing people with the condition and their families. DAWN Youth initiatives are being implemented in many countries worldwide in order to improve various aspects of psychosocial support, and draw attention to some fundamental shortcomings in current healthcare systems.

Peer support and positive results in Germany - repeating success at my Camp D

Recently, for the second time in 2 years, several hundred young people with diabetes were brought together with diabetes educators, diabetologists and employees of Novo Nordisk, in Bad Segeberg, Germany, to attend a diabetes camp that combined education and leisure pursuits with a strong emphasis on peer support. The 700 or so 16- to 25-year-olds from Germany, Austria and Switzerland were supported by 150 experienced diabetes support personnel; 35 diabetologists and psychologists were available at all times to resolve doubts and queries and resolve concerns.

Addressing shortcomings in diabetes care and school support in Spain

The DAWN Youth WebTalk survey in Spain demonstrated that, as is the case elsewhere, children with diabetes in this country suffer psychological problems; emotional well-being is low, while depression and anxiety are present in around 30% of the young people surveyed. The strong demand for psychological support was common to all of the survey groups. Children with diabetes and their parents and healthcare professionals reported that unresolved social and psychological issues lead to inadequate metabolic control in 26% of children and adolescents with diabetes.

Driving research and action for long-term improvements in Denmark

A growing body of evidence confirms that in order to improve health outcomes, a transformation is required in the understanding and perceptions of the psychosocial issues that face all people with diabetes. In young people with the condition, these are exacerbated by the multi-dimensional challenges inherent in childhood and adolescent development. As in many other countries, a gap exists in Denmark between the psychosocial issues affecting children and adolescents with diabetes and current treatment practices.

From research to response in Italy - working alongside the Ministry of Health

People with diabetes require a range of interventions to manage their condition – medical treatment in isolation is not enough. In order to achieve optimum blood glucose control, the psychological, social and emotional aspects of living with diabetes also require at-tention. Diabetes and its related human, social and economic effects are important issues for the Ministry of Health in Italy. The Ministry’s commission on diabetes is engaged in developing plans to improve primary and secondary prevention and care of the condition.

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