Clinical Care

English

Understanding the development of diabetic foot complications

Foot complications are the leading cause of hospitalization in people with diabetes. Losing a limb is one of the most dreaded complications of the condition – with reason: compared to those without the condition, people with diabetes have a 15-fold increased risk of suffering an amputation. In this article, Vilma Urbancic-Rovan describes the pathophysiology of diabetes foot damage and argues that the amputation rate could be significantly reduced with improved care and education for people with the condition.

A new IDF worldwide definition of the metabolic syndrome: the rationale and the results

The metabolic syndrome is one of the major public health issues of our time. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) believes that this cluster of factors is driving the twin global epidemics of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. If current trends continue, the premature deaths and disabilities resulting from these conditions will cripple the health budgets of many nations – both developed and

Key aspects of care after a lower-limb amputation

Of all the lower extremity amputations carried out worldwide, 40%-70% are related to diabetes. In people with the condition, ulceration is provoked by diabetesinduced nerve damage, reduced mobility due to alterations in the functioning of joints in the foot, and disorders in the blood vessels that supply the legs and feet (peripheral vascular disease). When a person’s ulcerated foot becomes infected or when the blood supply is severely impaired, amputation of the foot – or even the leg – may not be preventable. People with diabetes who have suffered an amputation

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