Clinical Care

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Managing diabetes during fasting - a focus on buddhist lent

Ritual fasting is an essential part of many major faiths. Lent in Christianity, Ramadan in Islam, Yom Kippur in Judaism, or the Navratras in Hinduism – fasts vary in duration and in degree. Some ritual fasts pose challenges to the physical health and fitness of those following the ritual, which are significant in people with diabetes, who have metabolic disorders and use treatments that impair their capacity to fast for long periods of time.

IDF breaking new ground – building bridges around the world

With its latest round of funding complete, the International Diabetes Federation’s translational research programme, BRIDGES, has raised its game again, receiving 57 applications from 32 countries. This round of financial support ensured USD 65,000 per project and was dedicated to short-term projects lasting a maximum two years. Having undergone rigorous screening by recognized experts, nine of the projects were selected and will benefit from financial backing from IDF. Ronan L’Heveder describes the latest innovative projects to quality for BRIDGES funding.


Exploring ethnicity in people with type 2 diabetes in Australia

In 2011, the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Diabetes Centre in Sydney, Australia, joined the voluntary network of International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Centres of Education. There are currently eight such centres providing excellent diabetes care and education services in Latin America, Asia (including the Indian sub-continent and China), Europe and now Australia. Central to the aims of the Centres of Education are efforts to increase regional capacity to respond to the diabetes epidemic.

Needlestick injury prevention – puncturing the myths

Issues relating to people with diabetes injecting themselves with insulin quite rightly are an important focus of diabetes care. Concerns include avoiding the complications of inaccurate dosing, and ensuring the proper care of injection sites and correct use of blood glucose selfmonitoring. The current implementation of the 2010 EU Directive on sharps injury prevention, places the spotlight of attention on the safety and protection of healthcare professionals when they are administering treatment to people with diabetes. Questions arise over the risks to the diabetes specialist.

CDS facing down challenges to improved care for type 1 diabetes

China is experiencing an increase in the number of people with type 1 diabetes. New cases as well as improved life expectancy among people with established diabetes are behind the rising prevalence. The incidence of type 1 diabetes among children has been put at 0.59 per 100,000 people per year. Although this is farlower than in some other regions, such as northern Europe, our numbers are huge because China has such a large population – in excess of 1.3 billion.



The key to managing diabetes without tears – the treatment and teaching programme for flexible insulin therapy in Germany

Successful implementation of structured education programmes that teach people with type 1 diabetes to use insulin flexibly around normal

Taking the benefits of DAFNE to the UK and beyond

Two English diabetologists were among an international audience while Michael Berger told it to throw away the diet from the therapeutic approach

Positive results in Australia – OzDAFNE takes up the challenge

Australian diabetes healthcare professionals in Melbourne learned about the DAFNE programme for people with type 1 diabetes in 2004, during a visit to the International Diabetes Institute there by Stephanie Amiel. Rather like the UK teams a few years earlier, a teamof nine health professionals from four Australian centres undertook DAFNE training in the UK that year. Prior to this, there were no evidence-based group programmes providing structured education for people with type 1 in Australia.

Never say never – implementing DAFNE in Kuwait

There is overwhelming evidence that improving HbA1c reduces the risk of longterm complications and improves quality of life. In Kuwait, however, few people with diabetes reach their target levels and, as a consequence, remain at risk of diabetes complications. Healthcare professionals ask the people in their care to test their blood glucose three or four times a day. Yet in many regions, very few people with diabetes have received education on how to adjust their insulin according to their blood glucose results.

Great results for DAFNE Singapore – next stop, South-East Asia

In November 2010, a pioneering team comprising a nurse educator, a dietitian and an endocrinologist from Singapore General Hospital completed a
DAFNE course and postcourse educator training in Australia, at the OzDAFNE centre, Diabetes Australia-Victoria. This was the first step in a process that successfully took the DAFNE model Singapore. The Clinical Leads for the Singapore initiative describe the experience so far and look to the future and continental development of their growing programme.


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