The diabetes community needs your data to ensure systemic reforms of health care systems!

Disruptions caused by the current pandemic, such as restrictive lockdown measures, modified living conditions and inadequate access to care have placed a huge burden on people living with diabetes. Recent studies have also demonstrated that people living with diabetes are at higher risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19 and figures sadly tend to indicate that people living with diabetes having contracted the disease are more likely to be hospitalised, with potentially, worse outcomes.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted weaknesses in healthcare systems across Europe and lessons must now be drawn to start building a stronger and more resilient diabetes ecosystem.

To map the challenges faced by people living with diabetes and their relatives/carers, but also to help uncover the innovative actions and solutions which were implemented during the crisis, IDF Europe launched two surveys - one for people living with diabetes (now closed, see preliminary results here) and one designed to get the views and perspectives from healthcare professionals.

We thank all those who contributed to the development of the surveys and all diabetes associations that kindly accepted to translate them.

We are currently analysing the results of our survey aimed at people living with diabetes. A preview of the results was made available on November 17th.

If you are a healthcare professional, take the survey in your own language here:

Български (Bulgarian) : 

Čeština (Czech):

Deutsch:

English:

Español:

Français:

Ελληνικά (Greek):

Italiano

Lietuvis

Македонски (Macedonian):

Nederlands:

Português:

Polskie:

Dla personelu medycznego

Românesc:

Furnizorii de servicii medicale

русский (Russian):

Serbian - Serbo-Croatian

Slovenščina

Suomalainen (Finnish):

Svenska

Türkçe

 

In April-May 2020, IDF held a consultation with its networks, including the Blue Circle Voices (BCV), with the aim of learning more about the smoking habits of people living with diabetes and their perspective on tobacco. 178 people responded to the survey.

Key findings included:

  • 81% of respondents who used to smoke indicated having noticed an improvement in their health after stopping smoking.
  • 80% of respondents were aware that smoking is among the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and can have an impact on the management and control of all types of diabetes.
  • 63% of respondents who currently smoke indicated that they were never offered support from a health professional to stop smoking.
  • 58% of respondents who currently smoke indicated that smoking did not have any negative impact on their health.
  • A majority of respondents searched for information on the link between diabetes and tobacco on their own.
  • 48% of respondents who used to smoke indicated that their diabetes diagnosis influenced their decision to stop smoking.
  • 39% of respondents who currently smoke indicated the main reason why they did not stop smoking was because they did not want to

Click on the image to download the full results in pdf.  

Tobacco report cover
  • DA19 WP map 400px163 million adults (20-79) are living with diabetes in the IDF Western Pacific Region in 2019. This figure is estimated to increase to 212 million by 2045.
  • The IDF Western Pacific Region is home to 35% of all people living with diabetes worldwide.
  • Over half of people with diabetes (56%) in the IDF Western Pacific Region are undiagnosed.
  • Diabetes was responsible for 1.3 million deaths in the IDF Western Pacific Region in 2019 — the highest number of deaths due to diabetes of all IDF regions.
  • 1 in 8 live births in the IDF Western Pacific Region are affected by hyperglycaemia in pregnancy.
  • USD 162 billion was spent on healthcare for people with diabetes in 2019— 14% of the total global health expenditure on diabetes.
DA19 DA table WP


Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas 9th Edition 2019

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD)

TDH news picPeople with diabetes are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is a major cause of death and disability in people with diabetes, and a barrier to sustainable development.

In 2017, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), in partnership with Novo Nordisk, initiated the Taking Diabetes to Heart study to assess knowledge and awareness of CVD among people with type 2 diabetes. Data was collected between September 2017 and May 2018 through an online questionnaire in 32 languages. A total of 12,695 participants from 133 countries across all seven IDF regions took part in the study. The questionnaire comprised 17 questions divided into the following sections: demographics; CVD risk knowledge; CVD risk awareness; education on CVD by health professionals; and CVD information sources.

4219 responses were received from the IDF Western Pacific Region. Download the findings (pdf).

In October 2018, IDF held a consultation with its networks, including the Blue Circle Voices (BCV), with the objective of gathering their views on the UN HLM Political Declaration and IDF's preliminary statement. Some 78 participants responded to the survey.

More than 91% of them fully supported the statement.

Cover
Learn more about IDF's networks' views on the matter by downloading the  highlights report.
  • DA19 SEA map 400px88 million adults (20-79) are living with diabetes in the IDF South-East Asia (SEA) Region in 2019. This figure is estimated to increase to 153 million by 2045.
  • Over half of people with diabetes (57%) in the IDF SEA Region are undiagnosed.
  • Diabetes was responsible for 1.2 million deaths in the IDF SEA Region in 2019. 
  • 1 in 4 live births in the IDF SEA Region are affected by hyperglycaemia in pregnancy.
  • USD 8.1 billion was spent on healthcare for people with diabetes in 2019— the second lowest expenditure of all IDF regions.
DA19 DA table SEA 400px


Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas 9th Edition 2019

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD)

TDH news picPeople with diabetes are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is a major cause of death and disability in people with diabetes, and a barrier to sustainable development.

In 2017, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), in partnership with Novo Nordisk, initiated the Taking Diabetes to Heart study to assess knowledge and awareness of CVD among people with type 2 diabetes. Data was collected between September 2017 and May 2018 through an online questionnaire in 32 languages. A total of 12,695 participants from 133 countries across all seven IDF regions took part in the study. The questionnaire comprised 17 questions divided into the following sections: demographics; CVD risk knowledge; CVD risk awareness; education on CVD by health professionals; and CVD information sources.

929 responses were received from the IDF South-East Asia Region. Download the findings (pdf).

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