Nutrition

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The IDF Perspective: reforming the global food system to tackle diabetes and obesity

The role and responsibilities of the private sector in global health and development have evolved in recent decades. The view that the only responsibility of business is to return a profit to stakeholders is being weakened by the dawn of corporate shared values and a mushrooming of public-private partnerships, both of which have resulted in the leveraging of resources and expertise of the private sector to bear on many contemporary global health challenges.


Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Healthy Cities report

In our first Healthy Cities report, Diabetes Voice highlights municipal and national governing policies that are trailblazing new directions for human health.  

W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Debate: How low can you go? The low-down on the low carbohydrate debate in type 1 diabetes nutrition

As a means of representing relevant issues to the diabetes community, Diabetes Voice will be providing a forum in which experts can examine controversial issues and provide an argument supporting their point of view. The low carbohydrate debate marks the first in a series of many more to come.
 

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

Building expertise in nutrition and behaviour in the Colombian Caribbean: promising advances against diabetes

Occupying in the northwest corner of South America, Colombia has borders with five countries, including Panama to the north and Brazil to the south, and a Caribbean as well as a Pacific coastline. Colombia, with 45 million inhabitants, has the second-largest population in South America and although it has one of the largest economies on the continent, inequality and unequal distribution of wealth are widespread. Around half the population lives under the poverty line.

Prevention and control of type 2 diabetes by Mediterranean diet: a systematic review

In the 1950s and 1960s, the Seven Countries Study looked at the dietary patterns of people living in the Mediterranean region, and the term Mediterranean diet was coined for the first time. Traditional diets were considered to be largely responsible for the good health of people living in Greece and southern Italy. There is no single Mediterranean diet; 20 countries, each with its own socio-cultural and economic circumstances, have a coastline in the Mediterranean basin.

Diet and diabetes: lessons from the ruby red slippers

The 1939 film The Wizard of Oz provides an interesting metaphor for a discussion on type 2 diabetes. In the story, Dorothy, a young girl, is knocked unconscious during a tornado. She and her dog Toto are swept up in the storm and dropped into the Land of Oz, where she is told that to get back home, she must follow the Yellow Brick Road and seek out the magical wizard. Along the way, she meets the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion, who join her, hoping to receive what they lack themselves (a brain, a heart, and courage, respectively).

School as a resource for nutritional education and physical activity

Environmental  factors,  such  as  lifestyle  and  dietary choices, play a key role in determining a child’s body weight. Omnipresent and relentless advertising for low-quality convenience foods together with an over-reliance during leisure hours on television, computers and video games are driving an alarming increase in the incidence of obesity-related non-communicable diseases like type 2 diabetes among young people worldwide.

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